Vinyl Lacquer Master Plant Fire

mountainman bob

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2019-02-14 12:16 pm
FL Panhandle
In an interview with Pitchfork, Third Man Records co-founder Ben Blackwell said the Apollo fire “will present a problem for the vinyl industry worldwide.” He noted that Apollo was one of just two companies that make lacquer discs, and that the other, MDC in Japan, “already had trouble keeping up with demand before this development.”

^ Maybe that?
 

mountainman bob

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2019-02-14 12:16 pm
FL Panhandle
I always thought the masters were metal and had never heard of the lacquer ones......the article makes it sound like it’s just easier with the lacquer, and I’m guessing the metal ones are probably more accurate, and last longer.....just pricier?

But also re-reading the article makes it sound as though I had it backwards?
 
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PRR

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2003-06-12 7:04 pm
Maine USA
www.diyaudio.com
> thought the masters were metal

They don't cut metal. They cut "wax", or for the last 80 years lacquer. They metalize that, peel the metal off, stamp that on shellac/vinyl. (In mass production they repeat the middle steps to get more stampers per wax master.)

The real question is: does anybody still make vinyl records? Yes, a small but dedicated crowd is real into it. A guy I know is gonna have lots of solder-time after his stash of blanks runs out.
 

1audio

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2004-03-24 5:16 am
SF Bay Area
OT

Those shellac master discs were pretty good TT mats. (They are thin alloy sheet onto which shellac has been applied. Play them on your TT and they deteriorate very quickly, but sound wonderful for the first few plays)

Its not shellac which would be less of an issue. Those are coated with nitrocellulose Nitrocellulose - Wikipedia which is very flammable. Its no wonder the plant was a total loss. I hope they have insurance.

The process was similar to making magnetic disks. Since the disk drive business is collapsing maybe some machinery can be refurbed for this type of product.
 
> thought the masters were metal

They don't cut metal. They cut "wax", or for the last 80 years lacquer. They metalize that, peel the metal off, stamp that on shellac/vinyl. (In mass production they repeat the middle steps to get more stampers per wax master.)

The real question is: does anybody still make vinyl records? Yes, a small but dedicated crowd is real into it. A guy I know is gonna have lots of solder-time after his stash of blanks runs out.

The record factory in my home town uses both lacquers and direct metal mastering, see The plant - Record Industry