Vegetarian cooking

So, I've had this in the pipeline for a while.

Many of us are rather good at cooking, and it frequently happens that recipes are exchanged here at the forum, I even recall an issue of the old DIY mag had a curry recipe by Morgan Jones, which was quite nice actually.

Now I got a good excuse for starting out this thread, Teabag has a condition that does not allow him to eat meat for the following 6 month.

I know from personal experience that SY is quite skilled in the vegetarian department, and yours truly and the Mrs. Magura also eat limited amounts of meat.

So, please post your best vegetarian recipes, so we can make sure Teabag stays as chubby as usual.


Magura :D
 
Aloo Gobi

Serves 4 persons as main dish, with bread on the side.

An Indian dish we have enjoyed frequently, both as a side dish and as main course.

Ingredients :
800 g. Cauliflower
800 g. Potatoes
1.25 dl. oil
1 tsk. cumin seeds

3 cloves fine chopped garlic
25 g. fine chopped ginger

0.75 tsp. Turmeric
1 tsp. ground chili
1 tsp. Garam Masala
2 tsp. ground coriander
2 tsp. salt

3 chopped tomatoes

Part the cauliflower in thumb size pieces
Cut the tomatoes in cubes of about 1cm

Heat the oil and fry the cumin for about a minute
Add garlic and ginger and fry for another minute
Add potatoes and fry for another 5 minutes
Add turmeric and chili and fry for another 5 minutes
Add tomatoes and let it boil for a few minutes
Add cauliflower, let it boil for another minute, then let it simmer for 15 minutes with a lid on.

Add salt to taste

Bon appétit

Magura :D
 
0.75 tsp. Turmeric
1 tsp. ground chili
1 tsp. Garam Masala
2 tsp. ground coriander
2 tsp. salt

Yes ..the salt after ,right ?!
Part the cauliflower in thumb size pieces
Cut the tomatoes in cubes of about 1cm
Into small flowerettes !!!:p

I know the version with also a cup of peas ,and the tomatoes just at the end (not cooking => fresh vitamins !! ) .No potatoes nor ginger (lots of garlic).



Also spaghetti with ginger -very nice ! Just add good olive oil and parmesan cheese to grated fresh ginger .
 
Yes ..the salt after ,right ?!

Into small flowerettes !!!:p

I know the version with also a cup of peas ,and the tomatoes just at the end (not cooking => fresh vitamins !! ) .No potatoes nor ginger (lots of garlic).

You're right on both accounts.

Also spaghetti with ginger -very nice ! Just add good olive oil and parmesan cheese to grated fresh ginger .

That sounds like a must try.


Magura :D
 

Rodeodave

Member
Paid Member
2004-12-26 9:38 pm
in the alps
Whatever you do, don't fry Gnocchi: YouTube - Fried Gnocchi

A very basic but truly amazing dish is almost anything pasta alla "Burro Grana", apparently also the favourite dish of Signore Guido Barilla himself.
You start by making pasta (Farfalle work really great) just below al dente. When draining the water, keep a little in a glas, like 100ml or so.
Then start adding some grated Parmigiano and fold it in with the plain noodles. Then add a bit of butter and fold in again, then again a bit of Parmigiano, butter, Parmiginao and so on. Have the pot on low heat while doing this.
When you feel like the grated parmigiano is making the whole thing a bit dry, simply add a dash of the water. With the water you'll be adding salt (since it's salten), so be careful with salting later.
You'll maybe need 150g of parmesan for 500g noodles, plus some butter.
The noodles should be coated with a shimmering layer of molten cheese. Add some pepper and you're almost done. The important part is to let it sit for maybe 10 minutes or so, the noodles will cook through with the remaining heat and moisture, soaking up the heavenly parmigiano scent.

If you want you can add a can of tuna, and some garlic and oregano to the burro e grana, and serve it with a squirt of lemon juice.


Another highlight is a Calzone di Verdure, a calzone with vegetables. Maybe SY can chime in on that, he seems to be quite competent...
 

Tea-Bag

Member
Paid Member
2006-02-08 2:32 am
Kennebunk
So, please post your best vegetarian recipes, so we can make sure Teabag stays as chubby as usual.


Magura :D

Me chubby, no - balding, yes.

I've been having fun with some raw food using a vita-mix blender, which can turn rocks to sand. It can liquefy any nasty vegetable to drinkable form in short order.

Today, cup of raw kale, banana, 1/2 guacamole, blueberries, water, low-fat soy milk.
The blueberries are native to the backyard, and froze a bumper crop this year.
 

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This one is real easy and cheap. Get a green, yellow and red pepper, cut up and mix with ranch dressing into cooked ziti.

Another, garlic bread pasta. Grind up a bunch of old (or fresh) slices of bread in the food grinder into bread crumbs. Melt butter and garlic. Toss in the bread crumbs and cook until golden. Toss with spaghettini. Top with parmesan. This one is a real killer.
 
Try thinnly sliced equal proportions of fresh carrot and leak saute'd gently in a little butter with a couple of sprigs of fresh thyme, with the lid on until just cooked through.
It is a great combination whether as a vegetarian dish or as a side dish for roast meat.
Plus it is really cheap to make.

Enjoy
 
Maybe Tea-bag ( Hi!:eek:) is a first timer in cooking ,and perhaps he didn't like vegetables when he was a boy :p
I would focus on which food is good for substituting meat ,i.e. proteins . From the vegetable world ,they come from beans and affiliates ; in the animal ,cheese (milk) and eggs .I should note that some recipes presented in here ,make use of pasta and oil and parmesan cheese ; I must admit I'm lucky to live near the 'source' ,so should you find which food your land grows . At the beginning ,like many others ,you can substitute the meat (any : mmmhhh :rolleyes: chicken de-boned with peppers ,similar to chinese wok way of cooking) with Tofu or the pure-gluten-ball...the seitan . I would prefer the soy derivated ...
I see that american people are not used to some vegetables we eat
-YES ! We are killers !!!- such fennel or artichokes ,which are very good .
Specially fried ! Or the artichoke omelette.
My basic food is bread :cool: The rest is side dish
 
The highest quality food that you can eat is that which you have grown yourself; we have not bought any vegetables since May of this year when we started on a couple of allotments. They are all grown organically and despite the late start we have given much of it away to friends and family which they delight in. We store our own onions, garlic, potatoes, red current jelly, blackberry and apple jelly, plum jam, plum chutney, rowan berry jelly, marmalade, pickled cabbage, blackcurrant jam; we have our own frozen runner beans, tomatoes, red and black currents, blackberries, gooseberries etc
It can all be a lot of effort but there is nothing more rewarding.
A recent discovery which is absolutely delicious is "Rosette Pak Choi" (Tat Soi) a stunning salad leaf well worth finding or growing (still growing under inches of snow)!
Enjoy.
 

SY

diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
2002-10-24 10:19 pm
Chicagoland
www.SYclotron.com
It's great stir fried with a LOT of garlic. But that seems to be true of any green. My favorite at the moment is a Chinese vegetable whose name I do not know (the signs over it at the grocery are Chinese characters which I cannot read), which the nice folks at the store tell me is called "Hollow Vegetable"). Big, green leaves, thin hollow stems which look like straws. Wonderful braised with garlic, a little soy sauce, and a few red pepper flakes. The Chinese grocery is your friend!

Chard is another leafy green that shouldn't be ignored- we did some sformata on Friday with chard, sweet potato, pecans, piquillo peppers, and eggs which took a little bit of fussing, but only a little bit.
 

SY

diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
2002-10-24 10:19 pm
Chicagoland
www.SYclotron.com
And only in the 4 or 5 week window in the summer when tomatoes are perfect.

One of our local growers had some heirloom yellow tomatoes which had a distinct citrus flavor. We did a yellow gazpacho with the tomatoes and yellow watermelon (substituting for cucumber) that was outstanding, especially chilled and sipped on our backyard patio in the August heat.