Tuning speakers to specific music genre

In the DIY speaker world, people usually design their speakers to achieve a flat frequency response. I wonder if there are people who tune their speakers specifically to certain kinds of music genres.

I've seen vintage JBL speakers modeled "L222 Disco". I think they designed this model to play very well with disco music. What do you think about it?

And how do we tune the speakers to match the characteristics of each kind of genre? I'm not sure if we could follow the "EQ" curves offered in some modern or digital audio equipment. Some music genres need a "V" shape on the measured frequency response; some need "W" "M", etc. Lol

Have you ever listened to the speakers that are specifically tuned to a kind of music, as described? What models? How do they sound?
 
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Yep, good speaker works for all. If you like to party, then there might be need to tune it a bit, especially if the system is loud near its limits. One could tone down the ear grilling treble, cut some lowest lows in hope for more kick :) if you have good system that can manage it without stress, then it still might need some slight balancing as hearing system balance changes with level as well.

Agains hifi myths, better buy amp or processing unit with Loudness button!:)Or, if you exclusively listen to narrow subset of music you probably want and like to adjust for that, what ever you like. There is no rules, but helpful guideline is to make the system some good anechoic response, and apply "tone", or house curve, or loudness, or whatever, as another layer.
 
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'Have you ever listened to loudspeakers specifically tuned to a kind of music?'

Yes. Sound Systems ( PA) for electronic music ( Drum and Bass, Dub, Techno,...)

'What models'

Custom.

'How do they sound'

Fun with the intended genre on a short listening period of time, boring and idiosyncratic long term. Garbage with other kind of music.

I agree with AllenB: this kind of thing usually have issue ( volunteer or not). The loudspeakers i liked the most were able to play anything sended to them.
 
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The difference between the L220 and L222 'disco' comes to tuning of the passive 38cm membrane : lower (20hz) and 'flatter' on 220, higher (50hz) with a boost on frequency response between 60hz/120hz on L222.

Iow, if you want to invest in an allround loudspeaker: purchase a L220 and implement the circuit i talked about and engage it when you want the 'bump' for dance music.
 
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In the DIY speaker world, people usually design their speakers to achieve a flat frequency response. I wonder if there are people who tune their speakers specifically to certain kinds of music genres.

I've seen vintage JBL speakers modeled "L222 Disco". I think they designed this model to play very well with disco music. What do you think about it?

And how do we tune the speakers to match the characteristics of each kind of genre? I'm not sure if we could follow the "EQ" curves offered in some modern or digital audio equipment. Some music genres need a "V" shape on the measured frequency response; some need "W" "M", etc. Lol

Have you ever listened to the speakers that are specifically tuned to a kind of music, as described? What models? How do they sound?

Yes, definitely. This is evidenced by my home theatre system: it's fantastic for movies and modern MOBO but sucks with older music and a lot of TV broadcasts. Subwoofers are a relatively new concept. NS10s were the industry standard for a very long time. Modern speakers and subs are reproducing sounds the recording engineers were never aware of. TV broadcasts and podcasts are also problematic. A presenter places a hand on the desk or shifts their weight and a terrific thud comes from the subs.
With dance genres the listener wants to hear the music the way they first heard and liked it. Using the aforementioned Donna Summer as an example: the listener literally heard 'On the Radio', on the radio (100hz to 15Khz), or, at the Disco, 2 x 12" and 2 piezos stuffed into a 70 litre cabinet (80hz to 20Khz).
 
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I prefer the classic"BBC dip" Just sounds better with all the genres of music I listen to. Flat FR might sound fine with Flim and the BB's, not so much with Pantera. Having a relaxed midrange dip helps one and still sounds fine with the other.

It's definitely all personal preference.
 
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I use tone controls to enable track by track adjustments.
I hope not to need them, 'cause why have to fool with it?

But they sooo help enjoyment (and are at times utterly necessary imo, given the vagaries inherent in recordings)

So yeah, I totally tune to whatever...be it a genre, or simply a song...
Can't imagine having to live with a fixed house curve any longer....
 
+ 1 for the use of tone controls!

Back in the 70s, I built 3 cubic foot enclosures, following Briggs' design, to house a pair of Wharfedale Super 10/RS/DD full range drivers for a friend.

I thought that the bass response was on the light side, but to my surprise my classical music loving friend did not remark on that, but requested I add a tweeter!

I deduce he preferred a lean bass response over an accented "boomy" one for its ability to accurately reproduce the tonality of the acoustical instruments.
 
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Yes. Sound Systems ( PA) for electronic music ( Drum and Bass, Dub, Techno,...)
Came here to say that. :up: PA systems are often far from flat, as they are used for effect. What would reggae be without massive bass sound systems? How harder to understand would airport announcements be if the system were flat?

I've had friends in the biz who put cast-off PA parts and pieces in the house to play rock and roll and it works beautifully, sounds live. Of course these friends are single. ;)
 
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Subwoofers are a relatively new concept. NS10s were the industry standard for a very long time. Modern speakers and subs are reproducing sounds the recording engineers were never aware of.

BS.
This kind of assessments just show you never entered a professional control room and never been present to a tracking or mixing session.

Sound of recording is done during tracking were there is no use for something like NS10: loudspeakers used are MAINS which are wide frequency range and (almost) not limited regarding dynamic behavior ( behemoth like big JBL's, Altec,...) to be able to reproduce the sound of instruments recorded, whatever it is ( including drums played by hard hiters). Iow monitors enabling musicians to listen to their recorded instrument at the level they played it with full bandwidth reproduced.
When operated by technical crew they NEVER reach the same levels as the one asked by MUSICIANS.

If used, nearfield are there to check if low end doesn't overload them. Period.

Mixing is different and the inverse happen: as mixing is all about balance of level of instruments between them there is no need for a system with such a widebandwith that 90% of end listener could not hear the lowest frequency range they produce.

So nearfield and limited bandwidth makes sense as low end is already 'done' and cheked at preceding stage.

Hence why you seen Auratones ( which were the 60's/70's NS10) incorporated into 'big analog desks'.

Mains are used to check low end and in most case to 'impress' customers ( producers). But when it happend engineers leave the room as they have to use their ears to work.

Ns10 were widely spread/used because: they are small, easily servicable and some major records have been mixed through them ( M.Jackson's Thriller being one of them).
In other words they were a standard known by most engineer including freelance changing facility on a dayly basis and used as common tools to different rooms ( hence acoustics) to have a kind of reference.

The fact that peoples in semi pro facility used them replacing mains is only because of copycat gear from pictures seen and little knowledge of procedure happening in 'big' facility.

Doubt about it?
Try to find a version of P.Newell's 'Recording Studio Acoustics' (Focal Press) were there is a whole chapter about NS10 ( as well as ATC mid and why it is so widely used) or read the next link:

https://www.soundonsound.com/reviews/yamaha-ns10-story



TV broadcasts and podcasts are also problematic. A presenter places a hand on the desk or shifts their weight and a terrific thud comes from the subs.
With dance genres the listener wants to hear the music the way they first heard and liked it.

Or maybe this is the inverse: subwoofers were meant to be used by material needing them ( in other word movies) and not on 50hz bandwidth limited signal ( broadcast is 50hz/15khz).

Blame poor procedure/misuse and behaviour of non professional people ( most broadcast are done by amateurs because of lack of money) makes more sense than spreading this repeated non sense in my view.
 
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BS.
This kind of assessments just show you never entered a professional control room and never been present to a tracking or mixing session.

The biggest artists I've had hands on experience with are Luther van Dross, Janet Jackson and Aswad. Studios do not work the way they used to, Recordings are made and parts distributed. Hence there's 97 remixes of every dance track. Along with the tracks being individually distributed, samples of various qualities are added.
Trust me, my brother-in-law is in double-digits for Grammys - I know how a recording studio works.
 
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^ so it is plain good you don't spread misconception about how it's done or have been done.
Things like no subbass until recently or everything done on NS10 are myth and should be treated as such.

One thing you should have mentioned about mix on NS10 is that when arrangers like Quincy Jones have defined the score you could mix only by looking at an RTA, no need for monitors.