TDA2050 and LM1036

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I want to know if this setup is okay:
I want to make a stereo amplifier for my product design project. I know that I am going to use the LM1036 for tone controls and two TDA2050 ICs to make it a stereo amplifier. I know that I am going to use a toroid for a power supply at +-15v dual secondary windings.
The only thing that I am confused about is about what power rating I am going to use. Should I use a 120va toroid?
The only things I am going to run are the two TDA2050 chips, the LM1036 and two LM3915 ICs (for visual effects).
I want the amplifier to output at least 60W (over 2 channels) through an 8 ohm speaker.
I haven't bought anything yet, so all parts are interchangeable!
Thanks for reading this!
 
30W of pure power at 8R?
Hmm.. If i built such amp, i would choose LM4766
Yeee yeeee... Some say it sounds awful aaaand 2 channells in 1 chip will destroy every single audiophile. :D

Most components from TI and amp made by NXP?

But TDA2050 would do fine and some would say it sounds better, i really havent heard them. :(
120VA would do well.
 
LM1036 is rather poor in performance. It only takes 1.6Vrms max which may be problematic with some modern sources from which the maximum output is 2.2Vrms such as CD players etc.
I looked a couple of days ago at the "older" (?) LM1035 which appears to be better suited. The following data sheet compares the two

LM1035 pdf, LM1035 description, LM1035 datasheets, LM1035 view ::: ALLDATASHEET :::

There is also a better chip TDA1524 especially if you use the DC feedback option shown bottom of P. 4.

www.datasheetcatalog.org/datasheet/philips/TDA1524.pdf

This one is available in kit form, today, too!

Very best regards,

Simon
 
The only thing that I am confused about is about what power rating I am going to use. Should I use a 120va toroid?...I want the amplifier to output at least 60W (over 2 channels) through an 8 ohm speaker.

You want 60 watts divided by two channels, meaning two 30-watt channels, total of 60 watts?

The rule of thumb is that a power supply should be at least 1.5 times the amplifier power, but twice the amp power is better. So your figure of a 120 watt (120VA) transformer is correct.

watts = volts x amps = VA

Just to mention it, I personally know of no real advantage that justifies the higher price of toroids. But of course a lot of people disagree, and using a toroid certainly can't hurt anything.
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