Table saw for speaker cabinets and wooden enclosures. (UK)

Question for speaker builders .
All been well we're moving house next month and I'm finally going to have a workshop again. In fact two workshops. One for woodwork and one for everything else.
I'd really like to make some good quality speaker and guitar-amp enclosures
I have quite a few good hand tools and some power woodwork tools. So far I have a miter saw. orbital sander and router. I'd like to setup a permanent bench with a table-saw and routing table integrated in.
I'd like to get the table saw first as I also have a lot of shelves to make.
Makita, Dewalt and Bosch are a bit out of my price range.
Would i be able to make accurate boxes with cheaper models like this http://m.screwfix.com/p/erbauer-ebs2504se-table-saw-250mm-230v/24053?_bck=1
 
I would say the only real problem with that is that it's a small table, intended for portable use.

For making speakers you could really do with a bigger table - but you could always make a bigger table round the existing small one?.

Funnily enough, I've got a table saw that I bought cheap from B&Q quite a few years ago now, which needs building in a bench/table - it's not a portable one. I've never got round to it yet though :D
 
I'd go for it. I have a similar quality table saw. Definetely not meant for commercial use, but quite adequate for the home shop. Read some of the reviews on the product!
The only improvement on my saw is an 80-tooth blade.
If you never owned a table saw please read and heed the safety instructions!
Cheers and happy woodworking, E
 
Question for speaker builders .
All been well we're moving house next month and I'm finally going to have a workshop again. In fact two workshops. One for woodwork and one for everything else.
I'd really like to make some good quality speaker and guitar-amp enclosures
I have quite a few good hand tools and some power woodwork tools. So far I have a miter saw. orbital sander and router. I'd like to setup a permanent bench with a table-saw and routing table integrated in.
I'd like to get the table saw first as I also have a lot of shelves to make.
Makita, Dewalt and Bosch are a bit out of my price range.
Would i be able to make accurate boxes with cheaper models like this http://m.screwfix.com/p/erbauer-ebs2504se-table-saw-250mm-230v/24053?_bck=1

If possible, I recommend buying a table saw only if you can directly check it out in person. I bought one on line that was similar to the one you referenced as far as features and price (different manufacturer though), but when I got it and found out that the way the rip fence was designed, it didn't (and could never) have a flat surface - so no possible way to get a straight cut using it. The end play of the direct drive blade motor was excessive, end play was nearly 1mm but no way to adjust it. The rip guide was small, wobbly and terribly inaccurate - practically useless. I sent it back for a refund, but it still cost me shipping. I now own this one: RIDGID 15 Amp 10 in. Heavy-Duty Portable Table Saw with Stand-R4513 - The Home Depot, it's nicely built, reasonably accurate (and everything is adjustable), and folds up into a nice small, self contained unit for storage.
Food for thought. ;)

Mike
 
Last edited:

prairieboy

Member
Paid Member
2010-11-22 2:31 am
In North America, there are a number of suppliers of Chinese sourced table saws that are modeled, loosely, after the Delta Unisaw. Suppliers like Grizzley (10" Hybrid Table Saw with Riving Knife, Polar Bear Series | Grizzly Industrial) have some saws that are very well rated by mags like Fine Woodworking. I know paying for shipping from North America would be ridiculous, but are there not importers in GB who have similar products?
 
Used tools are always available.
If you get a portable saw, get a good adjustable angle fence.
I explored portable saws, but in the end I got a 10" contractor saw, Rigid brand, it has served me well for a decade. Glad I went for the bigger saw.

A track saw might be an option for you. Takes longer to set up cuts and quick repeating of identical cuts is not possible, but it is as accurate as you can measure.
 
Thanks for the input.
I've gone of the Erbauer a bit as the tracks in the table are notched so you cant make your own jigs easily which is a bit daft I think the best bet I've seen at the moment is the Scheppach HS105 255mm (10")
its a bit more expensive but the fence and the table look better.
The beauty of screwfix in the UK is that they seem to let you return anything if you tell them it's crap.
RE safety, I have a friend who is a thumb missing thanks to a table saw. I intend to be very careful.
 
I don't use a table for my saw but would definitely recommend one with a laser guide for accuracy. I have very little room so have to work on the floor with a piece of 2 by 2 under the wood I am cutting. Not ideal but works out OK.

If you can get to view the saws you are thinking of buying you could test for end float.

We have a shop called Machine Mart and they sell loads of different saws.
 
I upended my circular saw and made the apertures in my table big enough for either it or the router. It is not anything like a professional saw. I just use it for ripping to rough size blanks or rough channelling. Then use the router to clean it up.

I bought a "power tool NVR" switch and built the table and fence using Axminster T track.

It's badger's rough but it works.
 
Depending on what all you want to do, you might consider one of the track saws. I bought the Makita a few days ago and used it for the first time this weekend. I spent yesterday building a fence for accurate cross cuts then used it today to cut the 20 pieces of 3/4" MDF I need for a pair of mid bass modules I'm building.

I was really impressed with the accuracy I ended up getting. And it's nice just pushing a sheet of material up against my fence and moving the saw across it rather than pushing a sheet across a table saw.

Four foot section of Kreg Top Trak, a Kreg flip down stop and stick on tape measure for the fence. Sacrificial piece of 1" thick foam insulation to support the sheet of MDF while I cut it.

-Chris


TrackSawTable2_zps0emngwnd.jpg
 
I have a local B&Q where they have a large vertical saw (8 foot sheets fit easily)
If I buy wood from them they will cut it free of charge for me.
I usually get the widths I want cut exactly then cut them to required lengths when I get home. This means I get a very accurate cabinet and it meets up perfectly for gluing.

I found that with a saw with a laser I didn't need a track for it to be accurate.
 
I have a local B&Q where they have a large vertical saw (8 foot sheets fit easily)
If I buy wood from them they will cut it free of charge for me.
I usually get the widths I want cut exactly then cut them to required lengths when I get home. This means I get a very accurate cabinet and it meets up perfectly for gluing.

I found that with a saw with a laser I didn't need a track for it to be accurate.

Are you saying that you freehand cut with a circular saw? If so you must have a much more steady hand than me.

There's a lot more to the track saw and fence than sawing in a straight line though. I calibrated that stick on tape and flip down stop so it matches exactly where the blade will cut. I don't need to measure and mark each piece that way.

The track provides zero clearance support on one side of the blade to reduce tear-out when cutting plywood. While supporting the sheet on the bottom does the same for that side of the cut. Not that it matters much for MDF.

And when I say accurate I'm talking perfect 90 degree cuts when checked against my nice combo square. And perfectly matching lengths because each piece is cut against the same stop.

-Chris