Subwoofers against Dementia

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https://interestingengineering.com/science/tactile-stimulation-40-hz-help-alzheimers-treatment

dave
 
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So if I want to help with my wife’s dementia I need to start doing raves again, and drag her along?

She prefers The Who and Led Zep, but there isn’t enough 40 Hz.
 

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So it appears that being a "bass head" is really a good thing after all.

She's got a higher chance of dancing with you if you take her to a festival with a proper sound system:

Reference:

Undetectable very-low frequency sound increases dancing at a live concert.​


https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(22)01535-4


Turns out it's better to listen to music instead of doing contact sports like boxing, or full contact football (chronic traumatic encephalopathy)

My favourite record labels were EyeQ, Masterminded for Success, With names like that, they were REALLY ahead of the curve hey? Thank you Kraftwerk, Tangerine Dream, Giorgio, Sven and all the other purveyors of fine Electronic Body Music from Frankfurt and Berlin, for giving us preventative treatment for Alzheimer's for the past 50 years...
 
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@planet10

Please note that the study you posted is referred to "whole-body vibro-tactile stimulation", not to listening to the 40 Hz frequency.

So maybe you should change the thread title since the subwoofers seem not to be related at all. ;)


P. S.: And now someone will say that the 40 Hz sound waves coming from a subwoofer also make the body of the listener vibrate... :rolleyes:
 
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However other studies than this seem to have shown improvements also as the following:

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnagi.2023.1129510/full
"We have previously shown that non-invasive sensory stimulation using a light flickering or an auditory tone repeating at 40 Hz induces gamma oscillations (which we call Gamma ENtrainment Using Sensory stimulation or GENUS) and reduces pathological features in the brains of different mouse models of neurodegeneration."
 
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@planet10

Please note that the study you posted is referred to "whole-body vibro-tactile stimulation", not to listening to the 40 Hz frequency.

So maybe you should change the thread title since the subwoofers seem not to be related at all. ;)


P. S.: And now someone will say that the 40 Hz sound waves coming from a subwoofer also make the body of the listener vibrate... :rolleyes:

Thing is, there’s nothing wrong with @planet10 ’s title. Please go read the original study- they used a 12” woofer, not an exciter


40 Hz vibrotactile stimulation was delivered using an acoustic system composed of a function generator, an audio amplifier (BOSS Audio Systems, PF2600), and a full-range speaker (BOSS Audio Systems, CX122) that converts a 40 Hz electrical sinusoidal signal to a corresponding 40 Hz vertical vibration of a diaphragm


Reference:
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnagi.2023.1129510/full



32-40Hz is indeed the frequencies that cause viscera to vibrate.

And no, you don’t need subwoofers if your system already goes to 40 Hz 😎
 
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Well, apparently the mice were in a cage which was placed on the woofer, and literally shaken at 40 Hz, with an amplitude of 16um (which seems rather modest). The paper describes this as vibrotactile stimulation. There's no measurement of spl given, but it can't have been huge at thst excursion. Also, in the photo in the paper, the woofer was unbaffled, so dipole cancellation could be a factor, even at the short distance involved. The researchers clearly regarded the stimulation as primarily tactile, not auditory.
 
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A 12" woofer in a sealed box driven at 40 Hz to a peak to peak excursion of 16um would give an SPL of approx 42dB at 1m. That's actually below the threshold of human hearing, on the ISO 226 curves. Looking at the photo of the setup, maybe the mice could hear a 40Hz tone - the cage they were in was actually being shaken, and they were obviously close to it. But the researchers clearly regarded the vibration as the primary stimulation, not the sound. (Maybe they should have put a microphone in the box with the mice to assess whether there was any audible sound in that location.)
Having said that, the paper refers to previous research suggesting that auditory 40 Hz stimulation produced similar effects.
 
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Actually regarding the possibility that sound was the key mechanism, the paper says this: "It is also worth noting the possibility that the 40 Hz humming noise generated by the vibrotactile device in the current study led to some level of neural entrainment and may have had an impact on brain pathology and motor function. However, since control animals were exposed to a similar amount of humming noise as animals undergoing vibrotactile stimulation, it is likely that 40 Hz vibrotactile stimulation accounted for most of the reduction in brain pathology and improvement in motor function observed in our current study."
 
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Bass and tempo can alter brain wave frequency when very low notes are experienced. "In the current study, however, they found that bass-heavy music was more successful at locking the brain into the rhythm. The lower frequencies, it seems, strong-arm the brain into synchronizing." -https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322792#The-tone-of-the-rhythm

Also see above.