Simple Ohms law question

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rif

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I've always seen it as V=IR.

I've always thought about it as R=V/I (resistance is defined by the ratio)

But I've been thinking, is it more accurate to say R= (change in V) / (change in I) ?

It doesnt make a difference if the V vs I curve is linear and goes the V=0 and I = 0

Any other kind of curve (tube transfer function, transistor curves, diode curves, etc.) and you get different results.
 
Is it more accurate to say R= (change in V) / (change in I) ? Any other kind of curve
(tube transfer function, transistor curves, diode curves, etc.) and you get different results.

Yes, for a nonlinear device this is the incremental (or differential) impedance, the slope of the tangent
to the V vs I curve at the operating point, or z = dv/di. This is in general different from the static resistance,
except for perfect resistors. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_resistance_and_conductance
 
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Hi,

Yes, for a diode you can only talk about the dynamic impedance,
as its not a resistor it does not follow ohms law, in any sense.

Generally you'd be talking about a devices transconductance variation
rather than the somewhat misleading dynamic resistance concept.

rgds, sreten.
 
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