shound I get this OSC.?

I agree, look for a decent used scope. It will be more versatile, take up less space, and probably have better specs. You can find them at places like Fair Radio Sales online, but a better place would be at a local Ham Fest. That is a gathering of amateur radio enthusiasts. If you are not aware of a local short wave club, contact ARRL's web site for listings of fests in your area.
 
Sorry for the delay, I'm surprised nobody else answered.
I don't know the Hitachi.
The older Teks that I have used are the 453, 465, 475, 2245, 2246. Of course many others will be good too.
Go for the 4 digit number ones if you can afford to. If you can't, then the 465/475 series takes a lot of beating. Choose one with a bright display.
 
The Hitachi looks a sweet scope. It'd do well for analysing many kinds of analogue problems, and most digital waveforms you'd need. It should be reliable - unless you accidentally blow it up:xeye: However, if it does go wrong, what is the spares situation? Before you buy, it might be worth checking with the dealer whether he can get bits, and whether they are affordable.

I can't tell you whether it's value for money where you are. It would be good value here:)
 
Not sure what kind of diff amp you're talking about. Do you mean a diff amp for the input of the scope to extend it's measuring capabilities? Or someting else. Most scopes can operate in a differential input mode using CH1 & CH2 probes, but a true differential input can be very useful.

It's not easy to blow up a scope. Excessive volts on the inputs is a way Eg 200v applied when set to 200mV range and a 1:1 probe:(

Speaking of probes: Make sure you budget for a pair of reasonable matched (same model) 10:1 probes. A scope is useless without them. If they are switchable between 10:1 and 1:1, so much the better for small signal audio measurements.

I normally keep 3 probes with my scope (a TEK TDS210), 2* 10:1 and 1 switchable. The switchable stays on the EXT TRIG unless needed for low level on a Y input.
 
Ask the dealer to demonstrate the scope using it's built-in calibrator. Watch for "iffy" switches and controls.

See if he will demonstrate it triggering on a "difficult" waveform.

As the X timebase speed is increased (clockwise rotation) it is normal for the trace to get dimmer. Make sure it's still bright enough to see at high speeds. If in doubt ask to compare it with another scope.
CRT's deteriorate (light output falls) with use, so this is a useful check.
 
Not sure what kind of diff amp you're talking about. Do you mean a diff amp for the input of the scope to extend it's measuring capabilities? Or someting else. Most scopes can operate in a differential input mode using CH1 & CH2 probes, but a true differential input can be very useful.

I read somewhere on the post that if you don't use that, the probe turns in a direct path to ground.


Probes:
TEK P6062B?

http://www.thetestequipmentstore.com/id72.htm

Speaking of probes: Make sure you budget for a pair of reasonable matched (same model) 10:1 probes. A scope is useless without them. If they are switchable between 10:1 and 1:1, so much the better for small signal audio measurements.

I normally keep 3 probes with my scope (a TEK TDS210), 2* 10:1 and 1 switchable. The switchable stays on the EXT TRIG unless needed for low level on a Y input.

??
What's 10x, EXT TRIG, etc. ? Newb to scopes.