Self driving cars are here. Thoughts?

Jan, I’ve seen some YouTube test rides of latest models of compact BEVs in which the regen braking was described as aggressive -“unintentional deceleration” when taking your foot off the “go” pedal is certainly something you want to acclimate to.

I can adjust it in three steps or turn it off, using some of those paddles behind the wheel.
It's not completely unlike driving a manual and braking with the gears, use level 1 and 2 a lot in low speeds, sometimes level 3 but not much, in high speed I turn it off or use cruise control.
Adaptive cruise control is great if there's a lot of slow traffic, but when there's a lot of intersections or roundabouts I touch the brake pedal to turn it off.
 
Kaffi - can I infer from your last post that you are currently operating a BEV of some description, or is it an ICE machine with one of the more advanced adaptive cruise controls?
My wife’s 2015 Subaru Forester’s Eyesight works well enough at speed on highways, but does tend to give a lot of lane departure false alarms under conditions alluded to above, and even a very annoying alert when the vehicle ahead departs at a green light. We even had a panic braking application in the first month of driving when pulling up very slowly to a parking stop when there was a growth of thick shrubbery about 6ft in front of the curbing.
“Honey, what’d you do wrong this time?
“Nuttin’ Sue, did you want to drive?”
“No, but please just be more careful, OK?”
 
Electric Hyundai Ioniq.
I usually have lane assist set to off, because the car can't see the lines when there's ice and snow, or gravel leftovers.
And the lane assist will quite literally, by force, take over the wheels, if you try to change lanes without blinking first (not a problem for me, I use the blinkers even if I'm alone on the road).

There's also an automatic system so the lane assist will turn itself off, if it registers that your hands are not holding the steering wheel. As long as you give some slight resistance to the steeringwheel with a finger or two, the lane assist and cruise controll is activated, the car will drive by itself just fine.
Seems to me that it's been analyzing my preffered driving pattern somehow, so the placement of the car within the lane is similar to what I would do. It could be a coincidence, but I somehow doubt that.

Yes, a single leaf or a few blades of grass may trigger the array of sensors around the car, but if I find that annoying I hold in the traction control on/off button for 6 seconds then everything is switched off completely.
 
I'm not against the technology, I am against the focus and direction of the money flow and the blind consumerism of it all.
It is my opinion that it would be more beneficial to work towards a complete restructuring of society, to have hardly any cars at all. It would solve a large number of issues, increased health because: less sitting still, less pollution because: less industry, fewer health issues because: strongly reduced exhaust fumes, less time wasted doing nothing because: reduced traffic so no lines. +++

I hear you. But I’m going to go as far as to propose that self driving/autonomous vehicles may actually be the 1st step on the path towards your vision. Maybe it will slowly steer us (no pun intended) humans towards relinquishing the control we desire and modify the way we transport ourselves. The individual autonomous vehicles may evolve into shared autonomous vehicles which may eventually get larger percentages of the population acquainted to using public transportation alternatives to the extent of taking cars off the road.
 
I'm not against the technology, I am against the focus and direction of the money flow and the blind consumerism of it all.
It is my opinion that it would be more beneficial to work towards a complete restructuring of society, to have hardly any cars at all. It would solve a large number of issues, increased health because: less sitting still, less pollution because: less industry, fewer health issues because: strongly reduced exhaust fumes, less time wasted doing nothing because: reduced traffic so no lines. +++



Exactly! But the only problem is: in modern society, driving has become an absolute necessity.
It's not good, and there's never been a time where building more roads led to less traffic. So it's leading towards a sort of self reinforcing cycle.
If we where the same amount of people as in the 50's, there would not be such a big issue with everyone owning and driving cars. But we're about 4 times as many people now, and everyone wants to have their slice of the pie so to speak. It would be wrong to tell a specific group of people that: "sorry, you guys can't take part in this."

The real BS is when we have thousands of different cars all going from the same A to the the same B at the same time. Each car carries one person. This may seem unrealistic, but take the city I live in as an example:

I live in a city that is popular. People like to live here. About half an hour from the downtown campus area is a massive software company that employs a very large number of people (and pays well). Lots of people who work for this company end up living in the popular city and commuting every day. This also leads to the construction of lots of $1M condos, demolition of beautiful old buildings, but I digress.

Personally, I think public transit is a great thing. At least from my visit to France, I thought the rail system was absolutely brilliant. If I want to travel from Paris to Nantes, I can take a train and be there in about four hours rather than driving for six hours or more. A high-speed rail system linking cities like Madison, Milwaukee and Chicago would be incredible.
 
I hear you. But I’m going to go as far as to propose that self driving/autonomous vehicles may actually be the 1st step on the path towards your vision.

Yep, probably is.
Just a roundabout unnecessary step. Get public transportation going properly and not for ecomic profit, but for a health and welfare profit, and you're there.
It's really weird for me to consider that public transportation is expected to generate growth and profit, you don't expect that from things like the sewage system. You just want something reliable that works when you need and expect it to.



Personally, I think public transit is a great thing. At least from my visit to France, I thought the rail system was absolutely brilliant. If I want to travel from Paris to Nantes, I can take a train and be there in about four hours rather than driving for six hours or more. A high-speed rail system linking cities like Madison, Milwaukee and Chicago would be incredible.

I think public transportation *could* be a great thing, but not when it's done for the wrong reasons. Currently right here: Expensive and still somewhat unpredictable.
 
With the much longer travel distances between large population areas, the cost of upgrading the required infrastructure - rail beds and rails themselves, some close to 100yrs old - could easily run into the tens of billions of dollars. Of course, then are bridges and roadways still required for local transit - autonomous or otherwise - when was the last time you drove across town or on the “turnpike “ without encountering potholes ranging from “ just a puddle” to “call a tow truck”? It’s particularly nasty after a freezing cycle followed by warming and heavy rainfall - even if you think you remember the worst of them, they can deteriorate at a accelerated rate.
 
The real BS is when we have thousands of different cars all going from the same A to the the same B at the same time. Each car carries one person.

I live in a city that is popular. People like to live here. About half an hour from the downtown campus area is a massive software company that employs a very large number of people (and pays well). Lots of people who work for this company end up living in the popular city and commuting every day. This also leads to the construction of lots of $1M condos, demolition of beautiful old buildings, but I digress.

This!!!

In a modern society, where most of us live in cities and have similar commutes...

Why are personal EVs even an option? At the end of the day...one day in the not-so-distant-future...only the wealthy will be able to use private transport.

Assuming some of the largest carbon contributors, actually make an effort to reduce their pollution...

But then, they dont believe the scientists, warning 50% of Asthma symptoms are caused by NO2, childhood brain damage due to diesel fumes, and Global Weirding.
 
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I think public transportation *could* be a great thing, but not when it's done for the wrong reasons. Currently right here: Expensive and still somewhat unpredictable.

Here in Belgium several cities have free public transport. When it's all said and done it turned out to be cheaper than the complex paid for - myriad tariff system and control/check system they had before.

Use is up to, less cars in the city. Being creative still pays.

Jan
 
Here in Belgium several cities have free public transport. When it's all said and done it turned out to be cheaper than the complex paid for - myriad tariff system and control/check system they had before.

Use is up to, less cars in the city. Being creative still pays.

Jan

I went to Belgium some years ago, good food, good beer. :)
Belgium, Netherlands, France and most other neighbouring countries, are lightyears ahead of Norway in terms of public transportation.

The main difficulties here are distance in combination with certain topographic challenges, temperature variations can be difficult.
Overall I think a proper public transportation system could be built, and the cost/benefit calculations would look pretty nice.