Really confused about umbilical cord connectors

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I have two Antek 3225 (300VA 25V) transformers for my MyRevC amplifiers. Is there any connectors that will support both transformers on 1 umbilical cord? Would it be more reasonable to have two umbilical cords?

I found these: rated for 1500vac
Switchcraft - HPCP41F - Electrical Connectors - Connectors - Allied Electronics
Switchcraft - HPCC4F - Electrical Connectors - Connectors - Allied Electronics

xlr, neutrik, iec connectors are only rated for 250vac...

Does anyone have any suggestions? I went through a million searches and I'm having a lot of trouble. thanks
 
I think I might be way in over my head with the umbilical cord. I might switch my design to 2 single monoblocks and try and shield the transformers. Although, I was going to fit my lighter note kit into the amp chassis, I can separate that as well.

Mickeymoose: I think you are right.
If i used one Neutrik connector, it has 3 pins. Would that mean 4 reds would go to one pin, 4 blacks to another pin, and 2 green and 2 blues to the third pin? Should both the transformers be center taped or not?

If I could only see a picture of someone wiring two antek transformer up to an umbilical power cord I would be okay haha.

AndrewT: I don't know...
 
I think I might be way in over my head with the umbilical cord. I might switch my design to 2 single monoblocks and try and shield the transformers. Although, I was going to fit my lighter note kit into the amp chassis, I can separate that as well.

Mickeymoose: I think you are right.
If i used one Neutrik connector, it has 3 pins. Would that mean 4 reds would go to one pin, 4 blacks to another pin, and 2 green and 2 blues to the third pin? Should both the transformers be center taped or not?

If I could only see a picture of someone wiring two antek transformer up to an umbilical power cord I would be okay haha.

AndrewT: I don't know...
If you put both of your greens and both of your blues to the third pin you will be shorting out the transformer.
 
If i used one Neutrik connector, it has 3 pins. Would that mean 4 reds would go to one pin, 4 blacks to another pin, and 2 green and 2 blues to the third pin? Should both the transformers be center taped or not?

If I could only see a picture of someone wiring two antek transformer up to an umbilical power cord I would be okay haha.

AndrewT: I don't know...
This frightens me.
Do alarm bells ring for anyone else?

Build two monoblocks. Copy exactly a good safe proved to work design and build example.
If you have any queries, post them before you start guessing.
 
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On Antek xformers red and black are the two poles of your input to 110VAC
Blue and green are the outputs, 25VDC.
*normally* you would rectify the signal and add some smoothing to get DC before connecting to your amps.
If that is indeed the case then you will need three connections per monoblock, V+, V-, and GND.
If that's not how you're doing it then maybe a picture or drawing will help you explain what you're trying to do.
 
Ok, I think the easiest way to do the umbilical cord, would be to have 2 neutrik 3 pin cords. One green to 1 pin, one blue to another pin, and one green and blue to the third pin on each neutrik connectors. The red and black wires go to the IEC input (with a fuse in the red). People are concerned with ground loops, which I have no idea what those are, so I'm still going to stick with the monoblocks. There is no reason not to after reading the discussion on AndrewT's post in the "The new "My Ref" Rev C thread" thread
 
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...... People are concerned with ground loops, which I have no idea what those are, so I'm still going to stick with the monoblocks. ......

If you are going to be building even mono blocks, or any other design for that matter, I highly suggest you learn about ground loops as your projects are likely to be plagued with all sorts of nasty hums and buzzes if you don't understand this concept well and follow it's dictates. Even copying another persons design could lead you into creating a ground loop that will cause problems. I have seen plenty of designs and schematics that left enough room for self determination that ground loops could be inadvertently created. This is a very basic concept that needs to be understood well. I would even go out on a limb and say it is probably the number one cause of hum in a diy audio circuit. When I began building amps and such I frequently had a nasty hum that I ultimately identified as a ground loop problem.

Good news is it is not a difficult concept to understand at all. I am not going to try to explain all the details here as a quick search should bring up plenty of easy to understand info on this topic.

Good luck with your builds.

One last thing, you really should read some articles on safety precautions while working with these circuits....this can be a deadly hobby of you're not really careful. I single charged capacitor on a circuit that is even unplugged from the wall can really hurt you....please be careful and observe safe diy practices, we want more of your questions in the future!
Jeff
 
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