"RADON gas" to use 1000 watt bulbs with one fan !

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I' m sorry in advance, if "Radon" means different in English. :) As far as I know; Radon gas perfectly blocks heat, I mean hot air...

Actually I don' t even know about chemistry, I get this idea from some DIY projector fellow. :p

The main idea is;

A small isolated room should be created, using two tempered glasses, at front of the light source.

This isolated room should be filled with "Radon gas."

I think isolation should not be a big issue. Isolation materials can be easily found in anywhere. ( Even in Third World lol )

With Radon gas, we can use 1000 watt bulbs easily ! I mean maybe we can put 1000 watt bulbs, using one fan !

I just put the picture of this idea;

[IMGDEAD]http://img190.echo.cx/img190/2203/1000watt2wi.gif[/IMGDEAD]
 
The problem you are going to have with that, especially if you are not in the ...ah.... third world...

Is that Westerners (at least USofAmericans) freak out when you mention Radon. For some reason I think you would have difficulty selling the concept here.

Same goes for DDT *used properly, also not dangerous*, which, apparently is from The Devil :D
 
DDT has saved millions of lives, but its certainly not without its downsides. That radon chamber uses 2 glass panes eating light is one disadvatage, and isolation materials might be easy to supply, but whos your gas supplier?

Another issue, if the gas is absorbing significant IR, its going to be heating up...

Methane absorbs quite a bit in near IR, but then you might want to use an explosion proof lamp...

Be alot easier to use a heavier IR filter, and maybe add a fan, make the pj body from aluminum.
 
SmC252 said:
Argon is cheaper, they even premake argon filled glass sheets but I think it's a bit pricey. Argon is used for welding so anywhere that has a welder or a filling station can fill up a baloon for you. We'll see how good mine works with a 400watt.


Forgot to mention, you do NOT want to inhale argon gas, it affects the central nervous center and causes irrepairable damage! So if you plan to play with it, do it outside and be very careful.
 
Tweeker said:
DDT has saved millions of lives, but its certainly not without its downsides. That radon chamber uses 2 glass panes eating light is one disadvatage, and isolation materials might be easy to supply, but whos your gas supplier?

Another issue, if the gas is absorbing significant IR, its going to be heating up...

Methane absorbs quite a bit in near IR, but then you might want to use an explosion proof lamp...

Be alot easier to use a heavier IR filter, and maybe add a fan, make the pj body from aluminum.

Actually finding a Radon gas supplier is not an issue here, in Third World. :p

I think my DIY projector fellow (who has original idea) is now working on this project, and he will probably use aluminium, as box material. Also, he has some good knowledge about chemistry (unlike me). So, he could make some safe machine. :)

I will publish some information, when he get some results.

SmC252 said:
Argon is cheaper, they even premake argon filled glass sheets but I think it's a bit pricey. Argon is used for welding so anywhere that has a welder or a filling station can fill up a baloon for you. We'll see how good mine works with a 400watt.

I' will be waiting for your results, but be careful please. :)


tjh said:
I guess I should finally search out that Radeon leak in my basement and start sucking the gas into a little chamber in my projector..

Actually my DIY projector fellow (who has original idea) is quite well informed guy about chemistry, and he can make a safe box. As I said, he is a "DIY projector fellow" lol. He' s making, and selling diy projectors since 2001 (also, he has 35 yrs background on projector repairing business).

So, when you try to realize this idea, your box will probably leak some Radeon, but his box will not leak anything, like Radeon or Nbidie. :p
 
Stocker said:
The problem you are going to have with that, especially if you are not in the ...ah.... third world...

Is that Westerners (at least USofAmericans) freak out when you mention Radon. For some reason I think you would have difficulty selling the concept here.

Same goes for DDT *used properly, also not dangerous*, which, apparently is from The Devil :D

Radon is great stuff -- here in Northern NJ there is a line of small mountainous ridges upon which homes were built -- there have been reports to the effect that is a leukemia cluster associated with the seeping radon gas. Most houses in this part on NJ are tested for radon.

With respect to DDT, it can be said that Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring" killed more people than all the wars of the 20th century.
 

pinkmouse

diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
2002-04-03 7:15 pm
Rotherham, England
Putting aside the radioactivity issues, I think you have missed one point.

What happens to the heat you pump into the Radon filter? It won't just disappear, (or if it does, you have just won a Nobel prize!). You will need to cool the filter just as much, otherwise it will just re-radiate the heat back into the enclosure, so you still need as many fans as you had before...
 
SmC252 said:
Forgot to mention, you do NOT want to inhale argon gas, it affects the central nervous center and causes irrepairable damage! So if you plan to play with it, do it outside and be very careful.

What?

http://www.dsm.com/en_US/html/agro/DAGArgon.htm

Seeing as argon is a noble gas, I would really be surprised if it could harm you.
 
pinkmouse said:
Putting aside the radioactivity issues, I think you have missed one point.

What happens to the heat you pump into the Radon filter? It won't just disappear, (or if it does, you have just won a Nobel prize!). You will need to cool the filter just as much, otherwise it will just re-radiate the heat back into the enclosure, so you still need as many fans as you had before...

I think you just don' t understand the "isolated place" idea... If isolation could complete with a perfect work, then there could not be any radioactivity issues. If we think with your understanding, then CRT displays should not be used... So, I' m not surprised with your reject.

Isolated area will not be -usual- filter area, first of all; it will work as a transparent heat barrier ! So heat will not be passed, it will be blocked in first area, and hot air will be exhausted via fan. So it won't work as a filter for heat.

However, it will work "kinda like" filter for light. So we can' t say; "it 's just a filter."

As I mentioned; there will be a 120 mm exhaust fan, and some little holes for fresh (cold) air input. Also, box material will be aluminium (for faster heat transfer).

I will let you informed, when my friend get something, like Nobel Prize !...
 
If the gas is absorbing IR its going to be heating up, thats what happens to the IR energy it absorbs. If its heating its going to be building pressure, increasing the difficulty of containment. Sure this can be dealt with, but its further complication to solve a problem you wont have with an aluminum box, 120mm fan or two and a regular IR filter. This isnt nuclear physics, at least not for most projects.

While its really not all that hard to order up chemicals in the US, the shipping & handling etc. is often outrageous.
 
Yes noble gasses can harm you, people have been killed in argon related accidents, it can have anesthetic effects. Radons another noble gas for that matter.

That said, you have some leeway, argon is 1% of the atmosphere, just dont go and huff it. No compressed gasses are to be treated lightly. My dad had the top valvebody break clear off on a cylinder once. It rocketed its way though a concrete block wall.
 
The amount of Ar in even a quite large residential window unit will do you no harm if you don't cut yourself with the glass when letting it out. Just don't go into a closed space full of it. I work with gasses for a living and as long as the air is regularly refreshed, and ANY gas not allowed to concentrate, everyone is perfectly safe.
 
I saw that someone had used a prism shaped water filled clear tank in front of the projection lense of a projector (as opposed to the projection lens of a ham sandwitch I suppose). I think it was to avoid keystoning. Since water cooling a computer is now a more expensive option rather than an indication of mental illness, pump, tubing and radiators to circulate and cool the water should be an easier way to go. Distilled water is cheap and watertight is a lot easier that gastight.

Sound possible?
 
Stocker said:
The amount of Ar in even a quite large residential window unit will do you no harm if you don't cut yourself with the glass when letting it out. Just don't go into a closed space full of it. I work with gasses for a living and as long as the air is regularly refreshed, and ANY gas not allowed to concentrate, everyone is perfectly safe.

This is very true, as a precaution always have lots of air moving and circulating. I won't touch gases without the windows open and fan pushing out the old air.

justme said:
I saw that someone had used a prism shaped water filled clear tank in front of the projection lense of a projector (as opposed to the projection lens of a ham sandwitch I suppose). I think it was to avoid keystoning. Since water cooling a computer is now a more expensive option rather than an indication of mental illness, pump, tubing and radiators to circulate and cool the water should be an easier way to go. Distilled water is cheap and watertight is a lot easier that gastight.

Sound possible?

I thought about water-cooling my projector. It would be very simple, I'd just need a pump, radiator, tubing, fan and some flexable copper tubing to wrap around the reflector or any other hot parts that you want to cool off. Copper has really good heat properties and is cheap, that's why I'd use it. Another thing I am still considering is the cooling system from an old refridgerator, it's similar to that of an automotive's freon-cooled a/c system. Very simple and very effective. Water cools better then air could even imagine. Not to mention those special "water wetters" that enhance the cooling properties of the metals and water. They do work, too.

As far as trapping the gas, it's quite easy! Here is an easy way to do it. Take two glass panes of the same size. Run silicon along all 4 sides on the outside but leave a SMALL space on one side. 10 minutes later carefully set the second pane on this piece and insert a small tube in the gap. Then fill up a bath-tub or other large object that can hold lots of water. The panes will be stood straight up so you want 12"+ of water. And even a regular baloon filled with argon would work, this is not a safe way to store it obviously, but it will work for this. Then you fill the panes with argon, if there is a leak you will see bubbles from it. Once it is sealed, the argon will come out of the hole and all the water will be outside of the glass panes. When you remove it, you're going to plug up that hose and take it out so that side is facing up. Slowly slide out the hose and add silicone where the gap is.You could do this in air but it will be hard to tell if it is 100% argon or if some air is still stuck inside. If I were to do it in air, I would do it so the hole was on the top, argon has a mass of 39.9, while oxygen has a mass of 15.9. (It's heavier.) Seems easier to do it without the water, but either would work.
 
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