Question about Vintage Pioneer equipment

My dad is giving me his old Pioneer cs811's and a pioneer sx1050 amp that he just found at a garage sale. I've always been pretty fond of the speakers, but don't know anything about the amp really. He used to have one similar to it, just w/o the tuner, but I was really young and don't remember much about it.

anyone familar with this equipment? comments? opinions?

thanks guys!
 
it should look something like this -- but silver (this is a euro version of th e1250 -- i use as a back-up power amp)

dave
 

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Sorry i mistyped... late 70s is right (i worked at the hifi store 1976 to 1981)
that would have been my guess since you knew the other stuff ;) just wanted to clairfy.

I got it all hooked up last night and I'm really happy with it. Everything is really crisp and clear and it will CRANK those sc 811's. I haven't pushed the volume past about 1/4 to 1/3 and they're definatly enough to **** off the neighbors if I'm not carefull.
even with the cabinets low on the floor they stage/image pretty good. I think they'll be great once I build some stands to bring them up to head level. These will definatly be used for my primary music listening set up. i have a cheap-o Technics receiver driving some no-name towers (front and rear) with a pair of Bose cubes for a center channel for my movie watching (until I can get some really nice stuff...who knows when though), but this set up sounds 10x better for music. The instruments sound very live and real.

my only complaint is there is something wrong with the balance knob. The left channel will cut in and out unless I leve something one the bottom right of it to push it up and to the left. There's a broken/breaking connection somewhere in there. Should I pull it apart and see if I can see it/fix it or should I leave this up to the pros? I have some basic soldering skills and can follow a pretty simple circut board. WIll this be big enough/simple enough for me to fix?

oh, here are some pics:D

[IMGDEAD]https://img.photobucket.com/albums/v321/cody6766/Stereo%20Stuff/SIMG0014.jpg[/IMGDEAD]
[IMGDEAD]https://img.photobucket.com/albums/v321/cody6766/Stereo%20Stuff/SIMG0015.jpg[/IMGDEAD]
[IMGDEAD]https://img.photobucket.com/albums/v321/cody6766/Stereo%20Stuff/SIMG0016.jpg[/IMGDEAD]
[IMGDEAD]https://img.photobucket.com/albums/v321/cody6766/Stereo%20Stuff/SIMG0017.jpg[/IMGDEAD]
[IMGDEAD]https://img.photobucket.com/albums/v321/cody6766/Stereo%20Stuff/SIMG0013.jpg[/IMGDEAD]
 
Have you tried the iPod direc tly into the power amp section?

Originally posted by cody6766
Should I pull it apart and see if I can see it/fix it or should I leave this up to the pros? I have some basic soldering skills and can follow a pretty simple circut board. WIll this be big enough/simple enough for me to fix?


Yes.. should be simple enuff to fix if it is solder...

dave
 

Netlist

Ex-Moderator
2003-01-18 9:50 am
You are a very lucky guy. Take good care of that old gear. :)
You have a good chance that taking off the bottom will expose the PCB with the bad solderings, if any.
It could also be a bad potentiometer who could use a tiny bit of contact cleaner.

Good luck.

/Hugo :)
 
Have you tried the iPod direc tly into the power amp section?
how would I go about doing that? Right now it's hooked into the Aux input on the back. I'll also be hooking up an input for my computer and for my DVD player (for CD's and the like)



You are a very lucky guy. Take good care of that old gear.
with out a doubt. My dad used to have a receiver just like this but my aunt overheated it at a party and they got rid of it. He just happened to see this one and grab it for me. This is going to be my new baby:D

I'll take a look at the internals and see if I can find it. it really soinds like a broke solder because the sound comes back if I push the knob up and to the left or straight in just a tad.
 
Originally posted by cody6766
how would I go about doing that? Right now it's hooked into the Aux input on the back. I'll also be hooking up an input for my computer and for my DVD player (for CD's and the like)


There should be a pre-out/power amp-in set of connections -- plug it into the power-amp ins -- that should give you a good idea of how much the pre-amp section is taking away from the sound. CDs ripped to the iPod in Apple Loseless will probably outperform your CD player.

dave
 
Originally posted by cody6766
What is Apple Loseless though...never heard of it. Is it a PC compatable program?


If you are using iTunes (the sw not the store) it is one of the options for ripping CDs. I ripped my entire CD collection to HD. I'll be using an iMac with a USB DAC as a substitute for a CD player...

dave
 
Hi dave,

I've been thinking about this for a day or so now, so I thought I'd respond just so I can go on to more profitable things:

I do the same thing for this reason: I have a pro-sumer sound card for digital audio recording and mixing, a card that is rated at 24/96 bitrate/kHz, produced by M-Audio, a reputable D/A-A/D hardware business (they're making mics now, too. Can't wait to try them).

So I figure that both features, that is, the extra headroom in the bitrate and amplitude along with the quality D/A converters make the music sound "better." Otherwise, I don't understand the science behind reproducing 44.1/16 on a CD player vs. direct-from-hd.

Is this why you do it?

Please answer so I can sleep tonight.

Dave
 
Originally posted by kneadle
I do the same thing for this reason: I have a pro-sumer sound card for digital audio recording and mixing, a card that is rated at 24/96 bitrate/kHz, produced by M-Audio, a reputable D/A-A/D hardware business (they're making mics now, too. Can't wait to try them).

So I figure that both features, that is, the extra headroom in the bitrate and amplitude along with the quality D/A converters make the music sound "better." Otherwise, I don't understand the science behind reproducing 44.1/16 on a CD player vs. direct-from-hd.

Is this why you do it?


I don't exactly know what you are asking...

Putting the music (at full rez) on the hard drive, with a big RAM buffer at hand, gives the computer a BIG theoretical advantage over a regular transport (when ripping the disk the software has time to go over & over a section to ensure all the bits are sucked, unlike a regular transport whichwhen playing in real time will sometimes have to guess).

The DAC should be outside the box, because inside the box is very noisy.

I've heard good things about the m-audio stuff and equally as bad things about their attitude to driver support.

If this 1st experiement works out, i'll be keeping my eye out for a firewire Mac and a better DAC (feeding from the FireWire -- DIY USB DACs & digital outs have already made board group buys on some forums, shouldn't be too long before we see FireWire ones.

My Xitel USB DAC is sitting in the post office as we speak i should get it hooked this evening and will be able to start listening.

dave
 
You answered my question. You do it, in short, for throughput advantages. And yes, that's also a reason to have the computer do it. I forgot about that one.

Exterior v. Interior DAC is one of those debates that continues to rage. Self-noise is a big deal among the pros, but I figure once you reach below 100dB, it's sorta like the speaker cable thing. At that point in an amateur's signal chain, there are other issues that should be addressed.

M-audio really ticked me off when they dropped the Dman 2044 like a hot stone. They refused to develop drivers for the NT kernel. Grr...So I bought their Delta 44, and I've been more than satisfied for 2 years or so.

Thanks,
Dave