Phenolic Resin (Lab Top) Audio Rack Shelves

I once made an audio rack out of salvaged maple butcher block for shelves and small aluminum I-beams vertical posts. Problem is the old maple started to split because of past improper storage.

I need to rebuild the rack with new wood or use a different material.

I was thinking of trying phenolic resin or epoxy resin shelves/tops, the same thing used in lab tables and countertops.

I might be able to source some used from the local university property disposition warehouse that is open to the public on the cheap, but would have to cut it down.

Question is, would this be a good material to use?

Uncutable safely?

Too weak to hold a lag bolt which is how my old rack was held together?

It will not sound good as it will suck too much energy out?

I see that a few high-end racks use it as trimming or some special composite mix of their own that seems to be similar.

I've also read that some high-end loudspeaker makers use it in their enclosures for it's anti-resonance qualities.

I do not see anyone doing exactly what I have in mind, just beating the bush to see what flies out.

Top 5 Materials To Consider For Your Lab Countertops

Are there any HPL (High Pressure Laminate ) audio rack shelves in use?
 
Last edited:

prairieboy

Member
Paid Member
2010-11-22 2:31 am
If you still have the maple tops, and they're stable, you could use epoxy with a filler to fill the cracks. That would stabilize it. And I'm not referring to the method of pouring a thick layer of epoxy over the wood as in ugly bar tops. If you're not familiar with good epoxy and usage, check System 3 or West Systems.
Did the maple split because it wasn't allowed to expand and contrast across the grain? If it split because of the way it was fastened, you would need to address that before epoxying.
 
If you still have the maple tops, and they're stable, you could use epoxy with a filler to fill the cracks. That would stabilize it. And I'm not referring to the method of pouring a thick layer of epoxy over the wood as in ugly bar tops. If you're not familiar with good epoxy and usage, check System 3 or West Systems.
Did the maple split because it wasn't allowed to expand and contrast across the grain? If it split because of the way it was fastened, you would need to address that before epoxying.
I've used West Systems before, didn't even think of that.

The thing that scares me is that the poorly stored +40 year old wood split, but also starting to split is some newer butcher block that I purchased from a local shop operating out of a barn in the country just over a year ago.

Those two new pieces were supposed to be matching amp platforms and have always been stored properly.

I think that I'm done with butcher block for a while now.