Peerless HDS134 MTM

I guess I'll be the 1st use the HDS134 in an MTM configuration! Wow.. I would of thought someone had done this before. I'm going to cross them around 3000hz to a Morel MDT 33 using a 2nd order electrical LR with a little baffle step added. Maybe something like this:

Any comments/thoughts?
 

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haha. oxymorons are great. pretty sure there's no such thing as negative help

I wouldnt call that negative help. he's mearly pointing out that a run-of-the-mill crossover wont show the real clearity you cna achieve with nice drivers. I know Madisound can custom design you a crossover for a reasonable price... kind of takes the guess work out of it for you and can save you some money in the end.

-Josh
 
kestrel200 said:
Thx for your negative help!!!!

HAHA no problem. The difficult thing is actually saying something useful because im not sure what to recommend.

These situations are difficult, in this day and age I wouldnt recommend anyone really building their own crossover unless they have basic measuring and design software. This is pretty easy to achieve because speaker workshop from adua is free, but it does require you build something & it has a steep learning curve.

If someone doesnt have their own equipment then I would say build a kit. Or (because that sucks all the fun out of it) buy drivers that someone has designed a good crossover around. Then you are free to do what you want with an xover, knowing that you can always fall back onto someone elses good design.

Designing your own speakers without measuring equipment is a bit like bucket chemistry. You know you will get a result and know roughly whats going to happen, but you cannot predict it with any accuracy.
 
Deagle50ae said:
haha. oxymorons are great. pretty sure there's no such thing as negative help

I wouldnt call that negative help. he's mearly pointing out that a run-of-the-mill crossover wont show the real clearity you cna achieve with nice drivers. I know Madisound can custom design you a crossover for a reasonable price... kind of takes the guess work out of it for you and can save you some money in the end.

-Josh
Next to Sarcasm, oxymorons are my favorite form of communication. One of my least favorite are people who make an assumption, not having enough knowledge to offer a useful suggestion, they then just offer something negative like don't try it.

The worst someone could do, even if they didn't have any means of measuring results, is a less than optimum result. Ooh that would be a disaster! Sometimes the responses on this board remind me of when computers and networking began to become popular and the computer/networking experts would reply to any questions with smoke and mirrors. It was all to complicated for anyone to possibley understand unless they had gone through years of extensive training. We all know that's not true. Heck the whole DIY spirit is learning from others, books, and by doing. We should encourage everyone. Not respond by saying oooh I hope you know what your doing, The speakers are much to good for someone who doesn't have the "special" training and doesn't know the super secret handshake. You at least actually offered a constructive suggestion when you mentioned Madisound's service. By the way I do have Speaker workshop, wallin's jig and I have built a couple, not 100s mind you, but a few speakers. I would like to see what others might have tried though so I can tray different variations. Because even with measuring equipment and software, I doubt that I'll find the ONE PERFECT Solution.


Thx Josh!!
 
kestrel200 said:

Next to Sarcasm, oxymorons are my favorite form of communication. One of my least favorite are people who make an assumption, not having enough knowledge to offer a useful suggestion, they then just offer something negative like don't try it.

The worst someone could do, even if they didn't have any means of measuring results, is a less than optimum result. Ooh that would be a disaster! Sometimes the responses on this board remind me of when computers and networking began to become popular and the computer/networking experts would reply to any questions with smoke and mirrors. It was all to complicated for anyone to possibley understand unless they had gone through years of extensive training. We all know that's not true. Heck the whole DIY spirit is learning from others, books, and by doing. We should encourage everyone. Not respond by saying oooh I hope you know what your doing, The speakers are much to good for someone who doesn't have the "special" training and doesn't know the super secret handshake. You at least actually offered a constructive suggestion when you mentioned Madisound's service. By the way I do have Speaker workshop, wallin's jig and I have built a couple, not 100s mind you, but a few speakers. I would like to see what others might have tried though so I can tray different variations. Because even with measuring equipment and software, I doubt that I'll find the ONE PERFECT Solution.


Thx Josh!!

I think most people who have got measuring equipment say basically the same thing as each other. This is because they know the vast difference having it can make, when you start to design using software you realise how precise your xovers have to be to ensure good phase responses, being almost impossible to do unless you have some way of measuring things.

I do not by any means want to discourage anyone from just having a go. But I know how unpredictable text book xovers can be and thus yielding less then satisfactory results, especially after you have spent a considerable amount of money on raw components.

This is why I say build a kit because your money will be well spent, most people want to build a loudspeaker that will surpass what they have already got, a text book xover is unlikely to achieve this, unless their speakers are really cheap.

For people who are a little more adventurous and want to make their own xover, this is fine too, but as stated before I recommend using drivers that have an xover already designed for them, so if you mess up you have something to fall back on.

Because you have speaker workshop this makes things much better, as long as you can do frequency response measurements, if you can then im sure you will come up with a really nice set of speakers.