Passive high pass filter for small 2.1 system

Hi

Just carrying on with the audio tinkering.

I have a new REL T Zero to provide some low end support for my DIY Helium Micro Monitors. I set the system up with REW and can definitely hear the improvement in sound reproduction (bass) but wanted to tinker with a simple DIY passive high pass filter between the preamp and integrated amp (or integrated amp and speaker), that I recently built. The REL currently takes a parallel signal from the speaker terminals in the integrated amp and it has its own crossover controls (perhaps this can be changed to the preamp outs, before any filter).

My intent would be to see if the Dayton ND91-4 would benefit from removal of some of the work at around <50Hz or so. I have seen single capacitors used in this type of application with claims of improved sound. Is it worth trying?

The data for my REL integration testing is attached with some brief explanation included. These are in room measurements with mic at listening position.
 

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PRR

Member
Paid Member
2003-06-12 7:04 pm
Maine USA
www.diyaudio.com
....The REL takes a parallel signal from the speaker terminals in the integrated amp and it has its own crossover controls....

So if you cut bass going into the amp, and the woofer takes signal coming out of the amp, how does the woofer get any bass?

Putting a 270uFd cap in line with the mini-speakers will change their bass-stress but can cause midbass resonance.
 

Sangram

Moderator
Paid Member
2002-09-25 11:01 am
India
The capacitor (or any sort of 6dB low-pass filter) won't do much, unfortunately.

I've almost always had to use either an active filter or tinker with the crossover to achieve a null and the network usually requires a humongous capacitor as the bump is very low.

I'm assuming you already plugged the port?
 
The capacitor (or any sort of 6dB low-pass filter) won't do much, unfortunately.

I've almost always had to use either an active filter or tinker with the crossover to achieve a null and the network usually requires a humongous capacitor as the bump is very low.

I'm assuming you already plugged the port?

No, I could try that simple experiment - thanks. Not sure how much the port contributes to the bass.
 

AllenB

Moderator
Paid Member
2008-10-18 11:31 am
Yes. PRR is correct, although sometimes it won't be a problem, if you have the parts you might as well see for yourself.

Sangram also has a good suggestion, because at very low frequencies the port allows the driver a lot of freedom to move.
 

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