Novice question

Your best bet is probably going to be to use internally whatever you use as the main speaker cable, i.e. between the amp and the speaker. In fact, you could always go purist, and simply run the cable direct to the amp from the speaker if you feel like it. That's rather drastic though!
I'm not one for spending huge amounts on cables; they might sound different, but different doesn't mean 'better'. Try some heavy-guage mains cable, CAT5, CAT5e or CAT6 network cable or whatever zip cord is available at your local hardware store: my view is the more copper (or whatever conductor material is used) that you use the better as you've less resistance: ultimately, it's just electricity after all. This is a highly contentious area however, and lots of people have lots of different views, which is fair enough. I try not to get involved in cable arguments (a minefield if ever there was one), but don't get too stressed about it: It's a short run; you can't do much harm, unless you use a stupidly thin or very odd combination of features; these always affect the sound, and rarely for the better.
Oh, and trust me: you're English is excellent by the way.
 

soongsc

Member
2005-03-26 2:31 pm
Taiwan
1. Around #14 more or less, copper or silver, non-plated.
2. If you use the compensation network, I would recommend foil inductors of the #14. This is where the longest wire run is.
3. Use same guage wiring from amp to driver, preferably the same material too.
4. Connectors are of great convenience, and there are too many types. In generall, the hand locked type is preferred for consistent pressure that won't loosen over time, more contact area the better.
 
To clarify, for mid / bass drivers, you're theoretically best using a wire with a large[r] cross-section. For the treble, you want a larger surface area (litz-style), nominally to reduce skin-effect. Think mains-cable for the former, and, say, coax, using the tubular screen as the conductor, for the latter, so long as you keep enough copper / whatever there to keep resistance as low as possible.

Cat 5 and its variations have a decent reputation as being a good compromise. The winding isn't enough to cause major capacitance / inductance benefits or problems, but it will help reject RFI slightly, and using a few runs, you get plenty of copper. It's also cheap. I still wouldn't be that bothered though; have a look at the articles here if you fancy a good and scientifically accurate read on this and many other audio-related subjects: Rod Eliot is a man who knows what he is talking about.

http://sound.westhost.com/articles.htm

Me? I'll stick to my 12g zip cord and the occasional heavy mains cable. But then, maybe I'm just cloth-eared.
 

soongsc

Member
2005-03-26 2:31 pm
Taiwan
Scottmoose said:
To clarify, for mid / bass drivers, you're theoretically best using a wire with a large[r] cross-section. For the treble, you want a larger surface area (litz-style), nominally to reduce skin-effect. Think mains-cable for the former, and, say, coax, using the tubular screen as the conductor, for the latter, so long as you keep enough copper / whatever there to keep resistance as low as possible.

Cat 5 and its variations have a decent reputation as being a good compromise. The winding isn't enough to cause major capacitance / inductance benefits or problems, but it will help reject RFI slightly, and using a few runs, you get plenty of copper. It's also cheap. I still wouldn't be that bothered though; have a look at the articles here if you fancy a good and scientifically accurate read on this and many other audio-related subjects: Rod Eliot is a man who knows what he is talking about.

http://sound.westhost.com/articles.htm

Me? I'll stick to my 12g zip cord and the occasional heavy mains cable. But then, maybe I'm just cloth-eared.

If you use litz wire, normally you have the diameter in each hair such that the effective area is the same for the whole audio range, so that you should actually use the same size for all drivers, otherwise the effective impedance would not be the same.

However, normally the longest wire run is in the inductor if you use a compensation circuit for the JX92, so that would be the critical path in the signal flow.
 
Just want to share a picture of the project finished. My "Klonus".
They sound great... and getting better every day.

Thanks
 

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Another alternative to cat-5 cable is shielded phone cable : the cross-sectional area is a little higher, and you still have the benefits of using separated conductors. It is also cheaper. If you have the choice, prefer a cable with PE insulation rather than PVC and with a real screen (copper twists or aluminium foils) rather than with a Mylar or this kind of metalized plastic film.

The most important thing, more than cat-5 or cat-6, is to SE-PA-RATE the cables !!

You must keep them a few centimeters away from the other to avoid very problematic electromagnetic interactions between the wires. Another solution when you don't have place for that is to twist the cables. It's yet prefered to separate them.

The advantage of the shield is double :
1) the EM interactions can hardly not pass through the shield, it allows placing the wires nearer from each other

2) it makes an EMI/RFI shield which screens the cable from external RF perturabtions. It is though not a real issue for speaker cables.

Just my 2c
 
Another alternative to cat-5 cable is shielded phone cable : the cross-sectional area is a little higher, and you still have the benefits of using separated conductors. It is also cheaper. If you have the choice, prefer a cable with PE insulation rather than PVC and with a real screen (copper twists or aluminium foils) rather than with a Mylar or this kind of metalized plastic film.

The most important thing, more than cat-5 or cat-6, is to SE-PA-RATE the cables !!

You must keep them a few centimeters away from the other to avoid very problematic electromagnetic interactions between the wires. Another solution when you don't have place for that is to twist the cables. It's yet prefered to separate them.

The advantage of the shield is double :
1) the EM interactions can hardly not pass through the shield, it allows placing the wires nearer from each other

2) it makes an EMI/RFI shield which screens the cable from external RF perturabtions. It is though not a real issue for speaker cables.

Just my 2c

Thanx, youyoung21147
maybe in the next project ;)