Noisy disc spinner - Marantz 63MKII KI special edition

SAC

Member
2007-02-15 12:43 pm
London
Want to sell this player, but with a noisy disc spinner I fear I will have trouble. I have barely used it since I bought it new years ago!

Anyone know why it makes a constant hiss when the disc is spinning? Having taken off the lid and put my ear to it and pressed on parts, I would say it is not the disc itself touching any surfaces, but something within the motor mechanism.

Perhaps oiling may remedy this?

Could this website list be relevant?
http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/F_cdfaq4.html#CDFAQ_025
7.1.23) Repetitive noise at disc rotation rate.
Possible causes:

1. Dirty, scratched, or defective (possibly warped) disc.
2. Dirty or damaged objective lens, suspension, obstruction, etc.
3. Loose spindle or foreign material on spindle table.
4. Disc not firmly clamped.
5. Bent spindle.
6. Excessive spindle runout due to worn bearing.
7. Need for servo alignment.
8. Weak laser or other component in optical pickup.
 
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Mooly

Administrator
Paid Member
2007-09-15 8:14 am
Hiss (white noise) is caused by the focus coil in the pickup acting like a speaker. Its something many players do and can be caused by the focus gain adjustment being set to high in the servo but I think the Marantz uses the CDM12.1 ? or 12.4 pickup which as far as I know doesn't have a user adjustable setting in the servo circuitry.

Its nothing to worry over.
 

SAC

Member
2007-02-15 12:43 pm
London
Hi Mooly,

Sounds plausible, and having taken the loading mechanism out I cannot see anything adjustable so it may be as you say.

Indeed the player works, but it is noisy enough that it distracts from music played. It can be heard from quite far away. I doubt I can sell it like this:(

P.S. Just to be clear, the player did not do this previously.
 
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Be careful to use oil or grease that's safe with plastic, and particularly with polystyrene. Most greases, and mineral oil, attack many plastics.

Did the hissing start suddenly? With a machine that's rarely used I suppose it's hard to say. Was there ever a time when it hissed, but not as much as it does now?

Is the hiss constant? Or is it related to rotation speed, or to other particular circumstances? Does it hiss immediately when it starts to spin, or only when it reaches playing speed?

Do you have a service manual? Does the machine have a test mode, entered by pressing a combination of keys at power-up? That may allow you to step through the mech's functions to find out at what point the hissing starts, and from that deduce which function is responsible.

New mechs are widely available but quality seems to vary a lot. There's plenty of more lowly machines with the same mech going for not much money.
 

SAC

Member
2007-02-15 12:43 pm
London
Hi, the user manual says nothing useful. Found a service manual on the web but that said nothing relevant either.

The noise is almost instant, and it gets to top spinning speed almost instantly. Nothing grates when I spin things with my finger. Moolys' idea sounds good to me therefore.

I think installing a new tray would be the best solution. I saw one on the web for not much money that I think is suitable.

P.S. The noise is indeed constant and started I think suddenly. I only pull this player out every so often for comparison purposes when I upgrade my system.
 
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Mooly

Administrator
Paid Member
2007-09-15 8:14 am
I think you'll find its "just the way it is" and a different pickup may or may not be audibly different. It can be audible across a room when no music is playing. You can see if the noise changes with CDR vs ordinary CD's but there is still little you can do.
 

Mooly

Administrator
Paid Member
2007-09-15 8:14 am
The focus servo is all the electronics on the main PCB that drive the focus coil in the laser pickup. I generally refer to the mechanism as everything minus the pickup so, no, a new mech will not fix it. A new pickup may be different/better/worse.
 
Looking at the manual for a plain cd63, there is a service mode, but it doesn't offer the option of running the disk motor without the focus engaged...sensible, considering otherwise it won't know how fast it's spinning.

To reassure yourself that the simple mechanics of the drive to the disk are not responsible, switch the machine off while the disk is spinning.

What you do depends on your motivation and attitude to risk. These machines don't seem to have a generic problem of intolerable hissing. As Mooly says, the chances are that the electronics are OK, so it might be solved by another mech.

If you simply wish to sell it, then describe the fault and offer it as is. If it seems an easy fix you may find it still gets a reasonable price.
 

SAC

Member
2007-02-15 12:43 pm
London
To reassure yourself that the simple mechanics of the drive to the disk are not responsible, switch the machine off while the disk is spinning.

Gave it a go, the noise stops instantly upon powering off even though the disc keeps spinning at the same speed. So, Moolys' suggestion still stands it seems to me.

If I cannot get good money for it I'd rather cannabalise that nice copper plated case for a future project. Good cases are not cheap after all.