Need assistance with wiring tweeters

Hey all,

I'm new to this forum and also new to car audio. I am still learning as much as I can.

I am building a sound system in my 2015 Harley Street Glide. I am running:

2- 6.5 inch speakers in the fairing - wired directly to the Sony AX7000 deck
4- 6x9 Polk Audio (4-ohms each) wired in series/parallel to:
Soundstream PN4.1000D 1000W 4-channel Amp with a 4 ohm rating of 140w x 4 channel

I was able to get everything working properly by wiring the 4 6x9 speakers in series/parallel, similar to the image attached:
[IMGDEAD]https://www.amplifiedparts.com/sites/all/modules/custom/tech_corner/img/speaker_power_handling_serpar_speaker_wiring.svg[/IMGDEAD]

I am happy with the sound, but I want more highs. To do this, I ordered 4 4-ohm super tweeters (DS18 PRO-TW220) at 225W RMS.

I ran them similar to the 6x9 speakers in series/parallel (since they are all 4 ohm resistance) to the "front" portion of the amp. The "rear" portion of the amp is running the 6x9 speakers. However, I am not getting any sound at all. The 4 tweeters come with capacitors built in. So, I was thinking about tapping into the wires for the 6x9 speakers to run the tweeters, but how would I do that without affecting the impedance? Where would I connect the positive and negatives to exactly?

Again, I'm brand new to all of this and refuse to pay someone to do this as I want to learn myself. Thanks.
 

rayma

Member
2011-04-29 8:37 pm
Try wiring them like the main speakers, and connected directly to the amp output also.
If it still does not work, maybe the combined total impedance is too low for the amp.
Then try the tweeters alone, if it works then, maybe too low impedance.
 
Last edited:
Try wiring them like the main speakers, and connected directly to the amp output also.
If it still does not work, maybe the combined total impedance is too low for the amp.
Then try the tweeters alone, if it works then, maybe too low impedance.

Since they're running in series/parallel, they should be running at 4-ohms, which is the rating of the amp. If I were to connect each one directly to the amp, then it'll be running in a parallel fashion, which would be too high ohms for the amp.
 
This is confusing. Are you running all 4 6x9's off one amplifier channel?

If you have a 4 channel amp and 4 6x9's, why not wire them one one per channel? Each tweeter would be then be wired in parallel with a 6x9.

I tried that. With one 6x9 speaker running out of one channel, the amp would shut off at mid level volume. I contacted the amp manufacturer and they said the impedance was too high. Per their words: "running each speaker at a channel is similar to running them in parallel". They advised to try series/parallel wiring and it worked.
 
Last edited:
The amp is rated for 2 ohms per channel. I don't know why it wouldn't run two 4 ohm 6x9s per channel. Run in series/parallel and then bridged is the same load but you lose all stereo separation.

Have you tried touching the tweeters to the 6x9 or front speaker terminals to see if you got audio there?

The loading from the tweeters isn't like a full range speaker. The tweeter only loads above the crossover point. If you have 4 ohm front speakers, you should easily be able to parallel two tweeters across each front speaker if the tweeters have series capacitors. If you're uncomfortable with that, run them in series.
 

rayma

Member
2011-04-29 8:37 pm
Then a two ohm stereo rating converts to 4 ohm bridged rating.

The 4 ohm quad tweeter network in parallel with the 8 ohm quad woofer network
gives (above the crossover point) a total of 2.7 ohms bridged, less than the 4 ohm rating.
 
Last edited:
Ray, I have no experience with this amp, but it's listed as stable to 2-ohm stereo/4-ohm mono.

Steve, let us know how it goes with 2 tweeters connected. You can connect one tweeter per channel on the fronts in stereo mode, or connect the two tweeters in series if you want to bridge the front channels in mono mode.



Edit: sorry guys, I was too slow to post...
 
Last edited:
Thank you all for your input. Unfortunately, for motorcycles, it takes alot more time to wire things than in a car. I have to remove the front fairing, gas tank, saddlebags, etc. I won't have time to do it until maybe this weekend, but when I do, I will print this forum out and try each one of your suggestions. I really appreciate your help. I will keep you all posted.
 
The amp is rated for 2 ohms per channel. I don't know why it wouldn't run two 4 ohm 6x9s per channel. Run in series/parallel and then bridged is the same load but you lose all stereo separation.

When I contacted the amp manufacturer and told them what I was running, they said the speakers are 4-ohm only and will not work in a 2-ohm fashion. I'm not sure if that is accurate or if I maybe misunderstood them, but they definitely wouldn't run when I did 2 6x9's per channel.

Have you tried touching the tweeters to the 6x9 or front speaker terminals to see if you got audio there?

I have not touched them to the 6x9's yet. Ideally, I wanted to run them on the front portion of the amp so I could adjust the gain and frequency separately, which is why I didn't even bother to try it. But, if all else fails, I will give it a try.

As far as touching them to the front speakers, it is a huge PIA running wires from the saddle bags to the front speakers, as they are "sealed" into the fairing. It would take about an extra hour just to try it.
 
Ray, I have no experience with this amp, but it's listed as stable to 2-ohm stereo/4-ohm mono.

Steve, let us know how it goes with 2 tweeters connected. You can connect one tweeter per channel on the fronts in stereo mode, or connect the two tweeters in series if you want to bridge the front channels in mono mode.



Edit: sorry guys, I was too slow to post...

Will definitely keep you posted. I would love to get all four working in mono to the front channel. If I can run them in series then I will do so.
 
Then a two ohm stereo rating converts to 4 ohm bridged rating.

The 4 ohm quad tweeter network in parallel with the 8 ohm quad woofer network
gives (above the crossover point) a total of 2.7 ohms bridged, less than the 4 ohm rating.

This is very interesting. I didn't try it because, to be honest, I don't know much about it and it scares me. But, I will give it a try. Thank you, Ray.