Name Of Dipole Speaker w/Soft Rubber Membrane

kelticwizard

diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
2001-09-18 2:33 am
Connecticut, The Nutmeg State
This has been driving me nuts for a couple of hours. What was the name of the speaker, produced in the seventies, that was a large dipole with a wooden frame, a soft membrane, fabric or rubber as I recall, with a voice coil fixed to the middle of the membrane. A brace held the magnet/voice coil assembly, the membrane did not have to support the weight. They were four feet high or more, quite large.

They were around in the early seventies, at least.

Any help would be appreciated.
 
The Sumo Aria was released in 89 and was 100% designed and manufactured by Highwood Audio of Calgary Alberta Canada. Some years later Sumo had to step away and Highwood Audio merged with Meitner Audio Of Montreal Canada. Your description would seem to fir the Aria. What do You need to Know? Best regards Moray James.
 

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kelticwizard

diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
2001-09-18 2:33 am
Connecticut, The Nutmeg State
Thank you for your answers. It is indeed the Sumo.

I just had a mental glitch the magnitude of which I never had before. I started reading speaker reviews and magazines in the early seventies, sort of put it down for awhile, then picked it back up in the eighties after I moved to a different state. I remember seeing the advertisements for the Sumo, but incredibly I now have the memory stuck in my brain that I am seeing the advertisement in the place I was in the seventies. Even now, although I now know it was the eighties and nineties, I still have the vivid and detailed mental picture of being in that old place looking at the picture in the advertisement.

Don't mind me, the nice men with the white coats will be coming any day now to drag me away.
 
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kelticwizard

diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
2001-09-18 2:33 am
Connecticut, The Nutmeg State
Anyway, when I first saw the advertisement for the Sumo, I thought that it was a cheesy way to make a speaker that sort of looked like an electrostatic, but was nowhere near as difficult to make.

Now, however, the thought occurred to me that perhaps this thing might have some unique directionality characteristics. I wasn't that concerned with directionality then, but now I pay more attention to it.

If anyone has any info on the Sumo's off axis response or where to get that info, it would certainly be appreciated.