My DIY turntable.

I thought I'd post some pics of my turntable. I had a collection of bits off an old Mission 775 which have been kicking around in my workshop for a few years so I decided to make some use of them. The bearing in the hub needed sorting so a friend made some new ones and fitted them for me and made some bits for the Grace arm which now sports a Hadcock headshell.


These are the original Mission parts. New bearing is installed.


Original idea was to make it in three sections out of perspex and this was the trial version in mdf.


However I decided to go with a more coventional build and put two sections in a plinth with sorbothane damping between each layer.


Second section with cutout for the arm base and lead.


Top section with Grace arm with original headshell removed.




Hadcock headshell fitted to the Grace arm.


Geometry is a mile out!


I made the mounting hole for the arm into a slot so I could bring it forward.


Looks good now.




It sounds very good indeed but I would say that I suppose! I hope to make my own arm soon.
Si.
 
hardwoodspark,

very nice turntable. What did you use as a source for sorbothane?

Interesting how many folks have no intention of putting BRAND xxx back once their new DIY table is built and making music.

I think more a quality of materials available to the average Joe vs. what was available even just a few years ago to manufacturers.

Did I say how nice your turntable looks (in a traditional way, which I think is good).


stew.
 
Thanks Stew.
I was initially going to use three layers of acrylic in an open design and I did a mock up using mdf. The idea was then to send the mdf away and have the acrylic made from these templates. However, partway through, I decided I'd rather have a more trad looking tt. So I made the plinth and used just the top two sections. I'm very happy with the result but I'm still going to make some acrylic sections just out of curiosity. Lets face it, a lot of us here get as much pleasure making our gear as we do listening to it!
The sorbothane decouplers are Flat Feet Ultras. Sold on Ebay in two sizes depending on the weight of your equipment. My aim was to achieve the isolation of a suspended deck with the solidity of a non suspended design. The isolation properties are not as good as they could be but I'm quite happy with the result. It's a compromise at the end of the day and we have to live with that.

Si.
 
Pascal, the plastic headshell is tricky to remove. It's glued as well as screwed. I used a soldering iron to melt the plastic where it joined the tube. I cleaned the glue off with nail varnish remover. You will need to extend the leads slightly. The Hadcock headshell is a touch slack on the tube despite the fact that the Hadcock arm is also 6mm. However it tightens down ok. Oh and bear in mind that there are no slots in the headshell. You adjust the geometry by sliding the headshell back and forward. You may have to reposition the arm slightly as I had to. I think it's worth the effort though.

Good luck, Si.
 
harwoodspark,
I am curious to know what`s the greatest diference btw the sprung
linn and your DIY sorbothane decoupled mission in terms of sound qualities?
And right now I am on the way of DIY Linn(having the used linn`s parts except the plinth),and your project gives some ideas in which I
would like to try if the end result is as described.

Complimenti!
 
Mikewong said:
harwoodspark,
I am curious to know what`s the greatest diference btw the sprung
linn and your DIY sorbothane decoupled mission in terms of sound qualities?
And right now I am on the way of DIY Linn(having the used linn`s parts except the plinth),and your project gives some ideas in which I
would like to try if the end result is as described.

Complimenti

Thanks Mike.
Maybe I should describe the sound of my Linn first to see if we are of the same opinion.
I fitted my Linn with an OL dc motor kit about six years ago. The bloated upper bass dissapeared and everything seemed more focused. Only a month ago I fitted a new upgraded dc motor and the sound opened up even more and speed stability improved. Instruments and voices could be picked out more easily. However it always seemed grey for want of a better word. My diy tt which is using the first dc motor originally fitted to the Linn suffers non of this greyness. It sounds vibrant and alive. I was listening to a Tracy Chapman lp this afternoon and I was quite surprised by the nice open sound. When a drum was hit hard it sounded like that. High hat sounded good and metallic. Bass is much deeper than on the Linn. You can hear everything going on in the mix. The isolation could be better however. I can still hear a small thump from the speakers when I tap the plinth but it's less than when I tap the top plate. This is with a record playing. If I did that to the Linn, the arm would jump. I couldn't go near the shelf without being careful. I've owned my Linn for many years now and I love it enormously but I'm very surprised that I can lash something together from a few bits of wood and some old tt bits that gives me greater listening pleasure. I think the platter may have a lot to do with it. The Linn's platter rings like a bell whilst the Mission platter is heavier but well damped and has its mass concentrated towards its outer edge. I'm using the same SRM Tech rubber mat that I used on the Linn. Also I'm using a modified Grace arm instead of the Ittok.

Si.
 
Thanks Bulgin.
I'm not brill at woodwork, but I can do a reasonable job. Some of the tt's I've seen on here are stunning but I don't have the facilities to do things like that so I opted for the more trad approach. I have learned to accept my limitations and work within those boundaries. I have recently bought a lathe in rather poor condition but I shall fix it up soon and a bandsaw which is rather better. With these I can maybe push those boundaries out some more.

Si.
 
Glad you like it Fungle. The base measures 350mm x 440mm and is made of 25mm plywood. The sides are softwood so assume pine, 10mm x 70mm finished in teak oil. The two inner sections are mdf and measure 340mm 430mm. That gives them 5mm clearance on all sides. The motor sits under the platter and that is why the plinth has good dimensions. I'm going to build the same thing in black acrylic shortly so I can compare the difference and see which I prefer. I do like a more traditional looking tt. I've also put the turntable on some ball bearing isolators which have had a very positive effect on the sound of the tt.






Si.