Looking for 160V ....

....large value ( replacing 22,000 uf) caps to replace the power supply caps in my Spectron. From I've been able to find out, none of the high end capacitor manufacturers (black gate, nichicon KG or Great Supply Series, Rhoderstein {once had a 100V pair of in an ealier Specton model - WONDERFUL!! Pity the amp was prone to breaking down all the time] ) make large value caps in this voltage. I'd very much like to replace the PS caps with something of higher quality. I know I can run 100V caps in parallel, but that would require something like 8 caps, to get the right voltage and capacitance, right? More money than I really want to pay right now.

Anyone able to point me in the right direction?

Thanks!
 

paulb

Member
2001-06-01 4:53 pm
Calgary
dsrviola said:
[B... I know I can run 100V caps in parallel, but that would require something like 8 caps, to get the right voltage and capacitance, right? [/B]
Putting capacitors in parallel doesn't increase the voltage rating.
You have 22000 uF at 160V caps in there now? Never knew there was such a thing. That's a LOT of energy (=C*V*V / 2).
You may want to consider putting lower-value caps in parallel as a means of improving your capacitors instead. 1/10, 1/100 and in your case 1/1000 the value would be good.
 
"Putting capacitors in parallel doesn't increase the voltage rating."

My bad. I meant series parallel. Regardless, it's too expensive.

"You have 22000 uF at 160V caps in there now? Never knew there was such a thing. That's a LOT of energy (=C*V*V / 2)."

The Spectron puts out 500W into 8 ohms.

"Are you talking about snap in ones or screw top?"

Screw top. The amp uses U36D series United Chemicon caps. The KMH series (http://www.chemi-con.com/files/KMH_LGKMHLGH9.pdf ) look like they'd be a step up from the U36D ( http://www.chemi-con.com/files/U36DU36DH9.pdf ). Now to track some down. If only they were 100V (sigh).

Comments?
 
dsrviola said:
I want to make sure I've got this right. If you run the same (voltage and capacitance) caps in series, you double their voltage capabilities, but their capacitance remains the same. If you run them in parallel, the voltage capability stays the same, but the capacitance doubles. Right?


Two capacitors in series double the voltage allowed but cut the capacitance in half. Three in series triples the voltage rating but the capacitance is 1/3 and so on...

1/Ctotal = 1/C1 + 1/C2