Licron Crystal aerosol spray

Yes.

Mask off the periphery edges of the diaphragm; so as not to provide a conduction path to the stator edges, but make sure the bias supply connection contacts the coating. If you see any fingerprints on the film, wipe them off with a cotton ball dampened with isopropyl alcohol. Then apply a single coat sprayed "just wet".

If you apply it on a humid day, it will blush (have a cloudy appearance) but will still work perfectly. Applied on a dry day; it will dry with a pale gray/blue tint that's almost transparent.

Fear not... it will work perfectly for many years to come.
 
Yes.
Applying a single "just wet" coat; I've coated six 12"x48" panels from a single 8-oz can. I was worried about running out on the last two panels so I oriented the panels at 45 degrees, which allowed me to hold the can upright and use its entire contents. There was NONE left over; so six was really pushing it.

Also; the last two panels were sprayed from the same can three years later so apparently shelf life isn't an issue.

BTW, allow the coating to dry overnight before assembling the panel.
 
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sumotan

Member
2013-10-16 4:18 pm
Thank you kindly again Charlie.
It's the raining season over here, so got to await for a sunny day to spray them. Sigh
Btw there's a slight wrinkle on a few spots. Thought of using a hair dryer to see if I could shrink the mylar but am afraid to burn holes. Lol

Thank again
 
hmm might be me but i had bad luck with Licron many times and some times in worked out great..... so i still dont exactly know what to think of the product. anyhow i would not hit it with a heat gun :( you might destroy the set resonance more then you fix witht eh few wrinkles. just my 2 cents, since they are tuned i guess as most planars.
 
hmm might be me but i had bad luck with Licron many times and some times in worked out great..... so i still dont exactly know what to think of the product. anyhow i would not hit it with a heat gun :( you might destroy the set resonance more then you fix witht eh few wrinkles. just my 2 cents, since they are tuned i guess as most planars.

I done seven or eight pairs of panels over the years with Licron Crystal and never had any problems at all. My current panels have been playing for five years with no perceptible loss of output. I always shake it well and spray on one coat "just wet".

I've heard reports of others having experienced problems with Licron Crystal. I recall reading where one builder punctured and drained the can, then thinned it with a solvent and wiped it on, in an attempt to reduce it's coating thickness and mass. However; I haven't heard of anyone having problems after spraying it on per the instructions on the can.

I can't speak for others-- just reporting my personal results over many years of use; which are 100% positive.
 
I've used Licron Crystal in all of my builds. It has performed uniformly well in every instance, but I also live in dry Southern California. I get mine from Mouser, $44 for an 8oz can. Perhaps I spray a lighter coating that most users, and end up with a higher bulk resistance, but I have been seeing a yield of about 12 2ftx4ft panels per can.

Thanks for that info SyBorg. I'm how consistently the fill quantity and propellant pressure is controlled in the manufacturing of the Licron. It did seem that I got less coverage from the last can I bought. As fate would have it; I just purchased two cans and I'm building eight 2x4 foot panels (four pairs of speakers), all at the same time. In the next week or two I will be ready to coat the diaphragms with Licron Crystal. Perhaps I will lighten up on the coating thickness (less wet) based on your result.
 
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neil5m

Member
2013-08-01 12:14 pm
I have not had much luck with the Licron Crystal coating either. Within a year, it failed with the surface resistivity meter showing insulative i.e. >10^12. I ran a cotton swab with alcohol over it, then it showed 10^9 but went back to insulative a few mins later after the alcohol evaporated. Showed the same result with acetone. The coating did not look damaged in any way and was still present, so I wasnt sure why it failed.
 
Yes.
Applying a single "just wet" coat; I've coated six 12"x48" panels from a single 8-oz can. I was worried about running out on the last two panels so I oriented the panels at 45 degrees, which allowed me to hold the can upright and use its entire contents. There was NONE left over; so six was really pushing it.

Also; the last two panels were sprayed from the same can three years later so apparently shelf life isn't an issue.

BTW, allow the coating to dry overnight before assembling the panel.


I agree, doing 6 from an 8-oz can is really stretching it. Do five per can for better quality.
 
I’ve recently read some mixed reviews in other threads about the long-term reliability of the Licron Crystal diaphragm coating. I’ve had excellent results with it so far myself, but I’ve upgraded my panels several times so my oldest panels have only 5 years on them. Also; I only use them for music playback, and not every day as one might do if they were used for TV home theater.

So, my question is; does anyone have long-term experience with Licron Crystal coated speakers in a home theater system that gets played a lot, or in a music only system that’s played every day?

The reason I’m asking is because I just sold a pair of my speakers to someone who is using them in a home theater system, and I’ve guaranteed the panels for my lifetime. Just wondering…
 
Hi Charlie

My speakers are now about 10 years old and I've had no problems.

Bolserst reported in one of his posts, I think, that that there is some degradation if the coating is exposed to UV light. My speakers are still unclothed and close to french doors in NZ daylight, which has a higher UV content than any place in the northern hemisphere - but they do not get any direct sunlight - light that falls on the speakers is filtered by glass doors and scattering off carpet and furniture in the vicinity.

I do intend to get a cloth cover on them at some time, and I imagine that will largely eliminate any possibility of the coating degrading due to UV.

I have heard anecdotally that some coatings age and loose flexibility and crack with age - and eventually there are enough cracks for the surface resistance to skyrocket so the coating becomes ineffective - but I don't know the truth of it or whether that might apply to licron.

cheers
R