Just Chillin

Man, life is great! I just finished the better part of 3 hours sucking on a few pints of homebrewed Heffeweise (I went easy on the Corriander this time) and listening to my best Bill Evans and Casandra Wilson CD's. I am listening through my Logans which is connected to my recently finished Aleph 5 and my DIYed Aleph P v1.7. Man, it just don't get any cooler than that. Pure ear candy. :D
 
Coriander in a German beer style?
Egad, lightning will strike you for even contemplating such a thing.
Now, in a Belgian brew coriander has a noble function to fill. Works nicely in strong ale or tripel, for instance...but that's another matter entirely.

Grey

P.S.: Also works well as an ingredient in a steak rub when you don't have time to marinade.
 

DaveM

Member
2003-02-06 4:23 pm
Vermont
Sounds like heaven to me. The beauty of homebrew beer is just like that of homebrew electronics; as long as it tastes (sounds) good, you did it just right.

I did 15 gallons of a wit beer a few years back. Spiced it with corriander, white pepper, and lemon grass. We used fresh lemon grass from the local coop instead of the dried stuff the recipe called for. Whoah!! that suff was fantastic and only got better with age. I think I have 2 bottles left. For now I will stick to the stuff in the keg (hopped pale ale is what's on tap at the moment, thought there is a brown ale in primary)

Dave
 
Dave, I will try lemon grass next time. I used lemon zest in mine. I love the citrus taste in wheat beers. I used some champagne yeast this time to bring up the alcohol content a bit. The specific gravity was just what I planned it to be at about 8%. I used Tettnanger hops. I used a 5 gallon stainlees steel keg as my second fermentor instead of bottling . It was sitting in my closet since early February. I have a card game going tommorrow night to finish it off and the guys have no idea what a treat they are in for.
 
GRollins said:
Coriander in a German beer style?

Grey,
Remember that hops are a fairly recent addition to brewing (a couple of hundred years) and that beers of old used many different spices including corriander. Back when wheat and other grains were used more so than barley.

P.S.: Also works well as an ingredient in a steak rub when you don't have time to marinade. [/B]


And an excellent flavour for chicken stock.

paulb said:
Oh, I just love it when people talk about beer.

Me too, it's one of my hobbies. Been brewing for over ten years and my Father was since I was a child, so I got to have er, um, well, one or two when I was growing up.

kilowattski said:
Dave, I will try lemon grass next time. I used lemon zest in mine. I love the citrus taste in wheat beers.

I like the idea of lemon grass as it doesn't dehead the beer like the oils in the zest do.

I used some champagne yeast this time to bring up the alcohol content a bit. The specific gravity was just what I planned it to be at about 8%. [/B]


How does the yeast make a difference in the alcohol content? I've always related that to the sugar content. Also, I find that 8% is high enough that you taste the alcohol. I'm not a fan of the alcohol taste so I never brew above 5%.

I used a 5 gallon stainlees steel keg as my second fermentor instead of bottling . It was sitting in my closet since early February. I have a card game going tommorrow night to finish it off and the guys have no idea what a treat they are in for. [/B]


I stick to one week in the primary and then 3 more in the carbuoys before it goes into the stainless kegs and gets gassed.

Hope the card game goes in your favour.

Cal
 
drakonis said:
So, you mean that I can get away with a decent beer without hops

Not in my eyes. Hops are what makes it beer to me. Nice stinky beer like Pilsner Urquell or Cal's special, medicinal homebrew. Kilo was talking wheat beers which are a different breed of animal.

Mark A. Gulbrandsen said:
Beeeeeeeeeelch!!!!!

Mmm...lots of CO2 in your beer?

prb123 said:
Wine, champagne, and Mead yeast are more alchol tolerant then normal yeast.

I was not aware. Good to know, thanks

I have some Mead that I just bottled that is 14%. [/B]


14%? Yuck! You could flambe with that stuff. Must make your liver quiver.

Cal
 
My comment on coriander was in reference to the German purity laws, something brewers should know about.
14% alcohol is quite acceptable. It's up to the brewer to have sufficient wit (that's a joke, by the way...it's a German beer style) to brew a balanced beer. Those who think higher alcohol is 'yuck' might do well to try a good barley wine, imperial stout, or any of a dozen different Belgian styles before assuming that it's terrible. After all, 14% alcohol is normal for red wine and no one torches their liver with it. It's all in the balance.

Grey
 
Jacco,

I am guessing that people here in the US are really getting tired of the standard American pale Lagers like Budweiser. Personally if I were given a choice between Budweiser or monkey pee, it would be a real struggle not to choose the monkee pee. It is just a matter of personal taste. I am sure there are also of Budweiser fans out there. I simply can't stand the taste of Budweiser. I much prefer wheat beers and pilsners but mostly I brew what I drink except for Pilsner Urquell.
 

DaveM

Member
2003-02-06 4:23 pm
Vermont
If I am correct Champagne yeast will run itself to about 18% before it kills itself. I have done mead with it as well as fortified cider (apple wine). Both need time before they are drinkable. If you crack a bottle within a year you will probably be unhappy with the hot alcohol flavor. But for those with patience there is a reward.

We did 53 gallons of cider fortified with 50 lbs of corn sugar. We used champagne yeast. primary in glass, secondary (2 months) in an oak Jim Beam Barrel (the reason for 53 gallons) and then a short tertiary in glass before botteling (mostly corked wine bottles) It runs to about 16% and is amazing. apple sweet, oak, burbon, tart, dry finish. Mmmmm.

We now are working on a setup that consists of a 140 qt mashton, 68 gallon boil pot, force chiller, transfer pump, peristaltic pump for sparge. For those special occasions when you really need (and I mean need) to fill the barrel. Homebrewing gone awry. Just like my audio.

Dave:drink:

Beer without hops... Ever had a lambic? Nothing but barley, bugs and fruit. Sweet of fruit and sour of grain gone bad. One of the best ways to end an evening.
 
DaveM said:
We now are working on a setup that consists of a 140 qt mashton, 68 gallon boil pot, force chiller, transfer pump, peristaltic pump for sparge. For those special occasions when you really need (and I mean need) to fill the barrel. Homebrewing gone awry. Just like my audio.

Dave:drink:

Beer without hops... Ever had a lambic? Nothing but barley, bugs and fruit. Sweet of fruit and sour of grain gone bad. One of the best ways to end an evening.

Where did you get that gear? Any good deals?