Jim Morrison Pardoned

What really happened at that concert? It is true that no one can agree. It may also be true that no one remembers. I know one thing. I can't say what I saw, and I was there. I was at the back of the crowd far from the stage. The song that started the commotion was Five to One. The band was late, maybe an hour late. Morrison screwed up the words to his own song, was obviously toasted, and did appear to be stroking something hard near his pants. Unless his unit was chrome plated, it was a microphone since it reflected the stage lights. But then again I was nearly as toasted as Morrison was. We left when the cops charged the stage.

I think there were maybe 3 or 4 concerts at that venue after the Doors show. The only one I saw was Steppenwolf. The venue sucked. Hot, no ventillation, no parking, loads of Miami cops........but then "hippie park" was a short walk away which was a flippin drugstore.

Welcome to the strange world of the liberal Republican.

Crist changes political parties whenever it suits him. He has campaigned as a Democrat, a Republican, and an Independent.

Maybe him and JM can get a gig together in Florida.

Don't forget Janis Joplin. I saw her at an outdoor concert in the Miami area also in 1969. She was even drunker, screamed more obscenities to the crowd and the cops, walked off the stage and refused to perform the rest of the show. Why? Because someone at the front of the crowd wanted her to sing Me and Bobby McGee, and she made it clear that she hated "that f*%$in song". No arrests were made though. Again, we left early.

Saw Hendrix in 68? or 69 at the Orange Bowl. Awesome concert. He was the opening act for the Monkeys!
 
I think it's important to pardon Jim Morrison even if it's too late. That trial has entered the public opinion as a mockery of the judicial system. Showing that the judge was wrong to convict him clears the court's public image more than Morrison's.

A person is innocent until evidence is presented that proves beyond reasonable doubt the opposite. Making that point clear is worth every penny of my tax dollars.
 
I think it's important to pardon Jim Morrison even if it's too late. That trial has entered the public opinion as a mockery of the judicial system. Showing that the judge was wrong to convict him clears the court's public image more than Morrison's.

A person is innocent until evidence is presented that proves beyond reasonable doubt the opposite. Making that point clear is worth every penny of my tax dollars.

You present a good and valid point boris81 ;)
 
For whatever reason Miami media in the late 60's had some kind of paranoia about the hippie / commie "revolution". McCarthyism was still alive and well. There was a very obvious bias against evil rock music, especially in the Miami Herald newspaper.

Dade county was running free outdoor concerts almost every weekend to keep the bored kids (like me) off the streets during summer break from school. The Janis Joplin show was one but most were local bands. The media never missed a chance to run a picture of some kid in the crowd smoking a joint in an effort to get the concerts banned. They succeded in getting them moved from the smelly cow field where Janis played to a nice beach on Virginia key! Not the intended effect. Anyone who sung negatively about the government was slammed in the media. Ohio by CSN (tin soldiers and Nixon coming...four dead in Ohio) was branded as evil commie music and not played on popular Miami radio, even though it was on the radio all over the rest of the country. The "underground" station snuck it in every once in a while.

The Doors concert was media propaganda for several days. Fuzzy pictures depicting beastiality on the front page. It was on the TV news. Morrison was tried and convicted by media long before he made it to the cortroom. I am sure the negative press in Miami helped kill the whole tour.
 
I think it's important to pardon Jim Morrison even if it's too late. That trial has entered the public opinion as a mockery of the judicial system. Showing that the judge was wrong to convict him clears the court's public image more than Morrison's.

A person is innocent until evidence is presented that proves beyond reasonable doubt the opposite. Making that point clear is worth every penny of my tax dollars.

I'll take the opposite view. Morrison was convicted in a jury trial. Because he died before he could make a full appeal doesn't make him innocent. It's better for the system that real convictions stand up until they are appealed. There ought not be any fiat rulings made on a person's guilt or innocence just because he is famous or popular. Indecent exposure is just one of any number crimes Morrison was guilty of during his life. Public intoxication, illegal drug use, sex with a minor - you name it. Not to mention perpetrating
fraud against his fans by charging money for concerts during which he was too intoxicated to perform.

John
 
Great Post!

I think it's important to pardon Jim Morrison even if it's too late. That trial has entered the public opinion as a mockery of the judicial system. Showing that the judge was wrong to convict him clears the court's public image more than Morrison's.

A person is innocent until evidence is presented that proves beyond reasonable doubt the opposite. Making that point clear is worth every penny of my tax dollars.

That's a good way of looking at it.