Is this a flawed design?

Bought a pair of floor-standing speakers from a DIY guy. I have positioned it in a relatively small room(12x11ft)! This sounds okay but I think the highs are not sharp enough and the soundstage feels below. If I bring my ears down (sitting on the floor) at the tweeter level, it sounds right.
Is this speaker design flawed? Should I use stands for this to compensate? Or any other recommendations?

Spec-
Woofer: HiVi D6.4 MKII
Tweeter: HiVi K1
Crossover Point: 2700hz (12DB/Octave)
Impedance: 5 Ohms
Sensitivity: 92DB
Power: 100-200(W)
Dimension: 35x10x12 (in)
 

Attachments

  • Schema.jpg
    Schema.jpg
    35.1 KB · Views: 140
  • speaker (1).jpg
    speaker (1).jpg
    130.9 KB · Views: 152
Member
Joined 2019
Paid Member
If you can post a schematic of the crossover circuit, or even a photo of it, the forum members may be able to work out the response profile.
Follow AllenB's advice and see if you can equalize the speaker to sound the way you like.

My thought is that the tweeter level needs a small change, but then my thoughts are suspect.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
If you can take some measurements, you may find part of the problem is the point where the acoustic slope of each driver meets. Normally, placing the high-frequency driver below the midrange driver (or midwoofer in this case) is done where 6dB/octave acoustic slopes are realized.

In this orientation, the D6.4 MkII and K1 would typically require a first order filter on each driver, as a start. The purpose of a first-order crossover in this inverted tweeter-under-mid orientation is to direct the lobe at the floor, so treble doesn’t disappear when a listener stands up.

With a second order filter like the speaker currently has, the lobe is pointed upwards about 30 degrees, but even listening at midwoofer height will likely place the listener partially in the lobe.

The speaker is a bit short. Most seated listeners’ ears are at 32-35” height, which is above both the midwoofer and tweeter. The issue becomes less as distance increases, but I believe measurements will also reveal the speaker needs to be raised. I believe at your distance you are hearing the lobing effect.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user