I see a project using Class D for all-in-1 speaker

There's no damping on the inside. How can you set up a speaker production facility when being so painfully clueless about speaker design and how did they even get someone to finance it?? the answer is probably revealed by their $200,000 "reference" speaker, I bet it's the same doofus uncle who was dumb enough to pay that much for a set of speakers is bank rolling this venture.
 

Neil Davis

Member
Paid Member
2004-12-07 3:23 am
Reston, Virginia
If they are really using the DECT standard, then each channel will be limited to a net bit rate of 32 kbit/s. You can combine time slots and channels to get higher data rates, but according to Wikipedia the upper end for data transmission is 500 kbit/s. That's just not enough to send uncompressed data. 44KHz audio at 16bits * 2 for stereo is 1.4Mb/s, and people expect more than 16bit 44KHz audio at that price range.

DECT does solve the latency/synchronization problem of WiFi and the point-to-point limitation of Bluetooth, but it just looks too limited in throughput to be useful for high-end audio.
 

Neil Davis

Member
Paid Member
2004-12-07 3:23 am
Reston, Virginia
Well, they use "OPUS 480Kbps lossless" which fits into your 500k bow limit.

According to the opus.org website and the RFC 6716, OPUS is a lossy format.

Code:
This document defines the Opus interactive speech and audio codec.
   Opus is designed to handle a wide range of interactive audio
   applications, including Voice over IP, videoconferencing, in-game
   chat, and even live, distributed music performances.  It scales from
   low bitrate narrowband speech at 6 kbit/s to very high quality stereo
   music at 510 kbit/s.  Opus uses both Linear Prediction (LP) and the
   Modified Discrete Cosine Transform (MDCT) to achieve good compression
   of both speech and music.