I feel ashamed using DIY speakers, am I alright?

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mtoc

Banned
2015-12-28 4:57 pm
Folks, I live in a circle which is not welcome to self-made speakers, they kinda despise any diy speakers (according to them, if common people wanna diy speakers, the result is only crap except you accept God's marvel, but they're fine with diy amp/dac), now I gonna diy my own speakers and I kinda feel ashamed, but I decide to build it anyway although I won't tell these guys what kind of speakers I have.
 

just a guy

Member
2006-05-12 6:59 pm
If a designer knows how to properly design a speaker and uses quality parts and materials the end result will be a good speaker regardless of who made it (commercial vs diy).

The problem is that most people that diy speakers have no idea what they are doing.

But you can rest assured, some of the people on this forum (and other diy forums) can and do design and build speakers much better than most commercial products.

But at the low price end of the spectrum it's very difficult to build something better and cheaper than well designed inexpensive commercial products like the Andrew Jones Pioneer line, especially when they are on end of year clearout sale.
 
You are terribly wrong to feel "ashamed", DIY speakers are incredibly fun to build and can sound incredible even when executed with novice level skills.

With a little more expertise (readily available on these forums and with free modeling tools), the results can be stunning and at a fraction of the cost.

I can't imagine caring what a group of biased individuals think, however I'd be tempted to build some speakers and then do some blind tests with them to see what they actually prefer listening to.

Javad
 

wintermute

Just another Moderator
Paid Member
2003-08-03 11:43 am
Sydney
Build and be proud. Be especially proud when they ask you what brand they are because they sound amazing! Looks can be a challenge, but some of the diy examples I have seen on these pages are truely amazing and an inspiration. You would be hard pressed to find commercially available speakers that look as good.

One thing I learned in life, is the important thing is to enjoy yourself, and to hell with what other people think! If you only do things that will meet the approval of narrow minded others, you will miss out on many opportunities.

Tony.
 

Lojzek

Member
2012-02-10 12:12 pm
Croatia
..(according to them, if common people wanna
diy speakers, the result is only crap...

You could prove your point by claiming that they
can't make themselves a proper meal unless they
go to a restaurant, which is true if they really have
no idea how to. No worries, maybe you will be
offering new speakers to these folks for a good
price like, total parts cost + 300% margin.:D
 

sippy

Member
2008-06-17 11:58 pm
Folks, I live in a circle which is not welcome to self-made speakers, they kinda despise any diy speakers (according to them, if common people wanna diy speakers, the result is only crap except you accept God's marvel, but they're fine with diy amp/dac), now I gonna diy my own speakers and I kinda feel ashamed, but I decide to build it anyway although I won't tell these guys what kind of speakers I have.

Sounds like you need to drop the 'circle of jerks' and upgrade to a 'circle of friends'.
 

Konzentr8

Member
2015-08-05 11:17 pm
Personally i think any product , be it speakers , amp or source that is built with " blood sweat and tears " has more kudos than any mass produced piece of equipment that anyone can go out and buy.
The Hi -Fi industry used to be full of small enthusiastic companies with dedicated craftsman designing and building their products in an age where maximum profit for minimum outlay wasn't always the bottom line.
Sadly with the advent of the home computer and the internet many of these companies met an abrupt end.
As this site demonstrates thought that spirt to create something " special " built with love, care and above all enthusiasm still exists .
Bottom line build your speakers and maybe change your " friends " ? :)
 
Do not give in to other peoples ignorance, every thing you can buy is made by another human. Most of the so called high end product are made by people who started in DIY, and most are made to a budget. Yes they may have the budget for a nice box, but a nice box have nothing to do with good sound. I have DIY speakers that sound far far better than most commercial ones I have heard at any price.
 

lauda

Member
2015-03-28 5:03 pm
Do it. You will learn a lot. And if you put in the right kind of effort, you'll likely have something at least on a par with an average brand name system, along with the ability to make it better as your skills grow. Be modest in your expectations and generous with your effort. The adventure starts now. :)
 
Just follow your own instincts, do what YOU think is right...

We can have all kinds of debates on what's best or if you can beat commercial designs, in the end you have to enjoy the process right? I enjoyed thinking of, designing and building my speakers and enjoy the results. That's what counts for me. Only a few of my real friends have shown some interest to come in for a listen. Not everyone is wired the same way. :)
But I feel like I made some new friends on here, that "get it".
 
To answer OP question...

If the speakers that you would build turn out like mine, then yes, you should be ashamed :D

On a more serious note (rare for me!) it has already been emphasized that (1) you should do what is best for you and bugger what anyone else may think of it and (2) the value of DIY. Even if there is not agreement on "what is best?" (and there isn't, nor will there ever be...this is a great confusion to the newbie!) I will make a pitch for the value of another angle: Buy good quality* used gear. For someone like me with limited money, patience, tools and (especially) competence, this ia an excellent avenue. To use a common example, over many years I've bought (and sold some) very old, quite inexpensive, Bose 901 pairs, the American Icon speaker that makes audiophiles foam at the mouth at its very mention :irked: , these are pretty durable and rarely have anything wrong with them (other than being Bose?) :) Using the Bose 901 as an example, here is a speaker that was (and still is) quite over-priced if bought new. However, you can buy a working pair for anywhere from $300-$600, is very likely to be in good condition, and importantly, you can usually sell it and get back most of your money. If your audio snob friends see them and curl up into a little ball on the floor, twitching, do you really care? Is your happiness or your friends' approval more important to you?

A thirty- or forty- year old speaker cabinet probably is in need of some minor refinishing. Any imbecile, even me, can clean, sand, stain, varnish, etc. with pretty good results. I can buy screws, new feet, etc. Replacing defective parts (drivers, crossovers, etc.) is a bit more chalenging but easily within reach of a DIY-er. Also many speakers have re-foam kits, etc. In sum, buying decent used gives you a chance to f- er muck :blush: around with a (presumably) good speaker and tweak it to your own likings.

All this long-winded post is to say a middle ground between pure DIY and buying new (with its 100% mark-up) is to buy used and fix it up a little. It is even likely you won't need to do anything to it. My most recent buy (three days ago) is my first-ever pair of "pro" speakers (Yorkville Unity U15) which were listed for "parts or repair" and I got about 1/4 cost of new, delivered. Other than expected wear and tear, I have yet to find anything wrong with them! In this case, they are speakes designed to be played VERY LOUD at a gig or for drunken patrons in a bar :drink: but at least for light-duty home use they are if nought else, a step up from the despised Bose 901. :rolleyes:

* Of course "quality" is whatever you mean it to be.
 
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