How fast do new CV axles get rust on them?

Destroyer OS

Member
2005-11-14 11:09 pm
PNW
I'm sure someone here knows, because there's so many people that like cars, too.

I had some CV axles replaced on a car. This was in October. I had to look under my car because maybe a rear brake or something is making an annoying sound, not sure. Well I looked at the axles and the shafts have rust spots on them here and there. The boots are brand new and look it. I paid like $1k for the job so I'm sure it included the two assemblies that around $250-350ea, as it said axle replacement. But now I'm not sure? There's no snow here, not on the coast, and only a tiny bit of rain recently.

When I have snow tires put on they may check, but I thought someone here could comment so I can make my own judgement. I probably should have done it myself but I don't have a lift etc, so it's a big PITA for me.
 
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The surface rust will vary depending on the manufacturing process of the axles.
When I fitted new CV axles on my 2CV I wiped an oily rag over them after fitting. That was three years ago. I live on the coast and there are minor signs of rust.

If I had left them clean then the rust would be much worse now.
It is all relative.
 

phase

Member
2004-10-04 11:59 pm
Bare metal can show rust in a matter of weeks or days if completely unprotected, so is normal.

I drove a car for not even an entire winter in Detroit and most of the bolt threads had been completely rusted away where they had been exposed. They are using more salt nowadays in west coast cities even...
 
This is normal

I'm sure someone here knows, because there's so many people that like cars, too.

I had some CV axles replaced on a car. This was in October. I had to look under my car because maybe a rear brake or something is making an annoying sound, not sure. Well I looked at the axles and the shafts have rust spots on them here and there. The boots are brand new and look it. I paid like $1k for the job so I'm sure it included the two assemblies that around $250-350ea, as it said axle replacement. But now I'm not sure? There's no snow here, not on the coast, and only a tiny bit of rain recently.

When I have snow tires put on they may check, but I thought someone here could comment so I can make my own judgement. I probably should have done it myself but I don't have a lift etc, so it's a big PITA for me.

This is most likely superficial oxidation. Unfortunately, high strength alloys used for this application have reduced corrosion resistance... always a tradeoff, like enclosure volume vs. low end roll-off in speaker designs.

If you are worried about it, and can find 70% phosphoric acid, (or rust converter, available at Lowes, Home Depot, etc.) brush some on the rust spots... they'll turn black overnite and convert the rust to iron phosphate, which is moderately corrosion preventive (it clogs up the anodic sites forming the rust)... but the important part is it's a great paint base... then spray with rustoleum black (or your fav color) and you'll be good for tens of thousands of miles
 
Rust on the surface of the axle is no big deal they’re not painted it’s just exposed steel they’ll rest pretty fast if you want them to look pretty you could clean them decrease them and paint them the only important part are the moving parts under the boots. As long as the boots don’t rip open and flowing out all the grease or you catch them just as the boots start the rip and you replace them immediately you should get another 200,000 miles out of the CV axles
 
Cv shafts are always painted or powder coated. It is quite possible that they were nicked during installation and that's why you see rust. Look at each cv boot outer joint and inner and see whether they look newish and the two circular clips holding each look shiny. Look at the shaft itself and see what labels are attached. Decades back mechanics would pull the joint apart and replace the boot. Nobody does that anymore. Cheaper labor wise to just put in a rebuilt shaft.
To test, drive the car in a circle and accelerate. If you hear clicking its a bad cv joint.
Nash
 
Cv shafts are always painted or powder coated. It is quite possible that they were nicked during installation and that's why you see rust. Look at each cv boot outer joint and inner and see whether they look newish and the two circular clips holding each look shiny. Look at the shaft itself and see what labels are attached. Decades back mechanics would pull the joint apart and replace the boot. Nobody does that anymore. Cheaper labor wise to just put in a rebuilt shaft.
To test, drive the car in a circle and accelerate. If you hear clicking its a bad cv joint.
Nash
Not on a Citroen 2CV or even on my Volvo V70, they are all plain steel, with a greasy rag wiped over them.