First Turntable For Me? Technics-1200?

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It would be my first Turntable, so I'm very excited :D

I know nothing of turntables!

I'm searching for a turntable... more of that I'm not actually searching, but considering to buy Technics 1200...
The guys from the local Dynacord store (here it is a major retailer of PA, musicians electronics and hardware) recommended it to me. And the more I read, the more I understand that they were very modest in their expression about that turntable.

I understand that 1200 is kind of a myth or a cult. I also understand that the needed cartridge is Audio Technica of almost any kind...

Sorry that the topic does not present a very good material for discussions, but I need to know if there are some underwater stones, or specific recommendations. Kind of reassuring needed.

How it should be kept? What care does it need except the 2 drops of oil every 2000 hours? Which cartridge should I choose? - On the cartridges I have decided that I'll buy a cheap one first in order to experiment and learn with it and considering the very probable ruining of it...

I am able to purchase through them many cartridges - Shure, Ortophone, Stanton, Numark and others

Am I right that the bigger price of MK5 is due to options that I don't need
Musicworld.bg - TECHNICS SL-1210 M5G
There is a cheaper MK5
Musicworld.bg - TECHNICS SL-1210 MK5

So I should buy MK2, but there are two MK2's and there is difference in the price
A more expencive black one Musicworld.bg - TECHNICS SL-1210 MK2

And a cheaper silver one
Musicworld.bg - TECHNICS SL-1200 MK2

Which one? :rolleyes:

If there is difference in the tone arm that makes better sound?
Also it seems that only the more expensive MK5G has wiring with oxygen free copper which is stated to improve bass? Is it worth the $220 difference?


But first question - I'm not going to regret buying it am I?

Best regards to all and thank you in advance for the answers!
 
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Only for home use... From what I read on the net there shouldn't be any turntables beating it's parameters at that modest to low price for a turntable.

I look at the wow, flutter and rumble figures - nothing else sounds familiar and comparable to me.

Edit: the price of the cheaper MK2 here is about 870$ without a cartridge. And the most expensive MK5G is 1180$
 
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frugal-phile™
Joined 2001
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Let me 3rd that... no direct drives for me, a less expensive well setup belt-drive is better IMO.

The arms on these are good thou... when i parted one of those TTs out, i kept the arm and plan on using it on a 2-armed Franken-Linn project (free inner platter/bearing, it won't be suspended)

I bet a Pro-Ject turntable for half the money should eat it for breakfast (made in Czech Republic (?) Pro-Ject will have the advantage of much less imbedded shipping & taxes). The money saved can be put into cartridge & phono-preamp

dave
 
Edit: the price of the cheaper MK2 here is about 870$ without a cartridge. And the most expensive MK5G is 1180$

Wow! I would look for a used MKII.

Pro-Ject turntable for half the money should eat it for breakfast

It's the other way 'round for the Debut III. The Xpression III was a little better, but had a very annoying spitty treble presentation, which I'll blame on the Ort. 2M Red that was on it.

jeff
 
no direct drives for me, a less expensive well setup belt-drive is better IMO

Why? From what I have read the Technics 1200 is one of the best, if not the best, DD turntable available. I would be surprised that a cheaper Pro-Ject or Rega belt drive platter would be better. Also not having to worry about replacing belts and being able to set the correct speed is appealing.
 
frugal-phile™
Joined 2001
Paid Member
You'll find very mixed opinions on the SL1200 -- almost like tubes vrs transistors. I'd take my poorman's Rega over Jeff's 1200 any day (i think he considers it his beater, the Linn LP12 being his main TT). That was cemented at this year's diyFEST after getting a chance to listen to a modern one.

The best direct drives are likely made by Brinkman & Grand Prix Audio.

dave
 
I'd take my poorman's Rega over Jeff's 1200 any day (i think he considers it his beater, the Linn LP12 being his main TT). That was cemented at this year's diyFEST after getting a chance to listen to a modern one.

Well, even I thought it sounded quite grim. It doesn't sound like that here, so there must have been something haywire somewhere.

I have one of those and I'm trying to decide if I should upgrade it or buy something else:confused:

I can drag the SL-1200 over for a comparison sometime if you're interested. You're welcome to demo the LP12 here as well.

Hmm.... missed that. Must have happened after I left :(

It was Sunday. I wanted to try out Gregg's phono pre's. We did the demo out on the back deck.

jeff
 
The SL1200 is rock-solid & will last you a lifetime with reasonable care - I have an SL1500 that I bought in 1976 and it's still working perfectly. The DD vs Belt debate is indeed akin to SS vs tubes...believe your ears. A good and reasonably priced cartridge is the Denon 103R MC. Those prices do seem very high - must be duties & taxes.
 
Not personally familiar with that model but did a scan over at VinylEngine. Direct drive system appears to be similar to that on SL-1X00 models. The linear tracking tonearm mechanism is fairly complex & these are something I shy away from in the interest of long term reliability. My SL1500 is a manual only (must cue arm manually at start & end of record) pivot tonearm so there is very little to maintain/adjust.
 
Thank you all for the replies!
But the result is that I am now more confused.

Pro-Ject are distributed in Bulgaria and the prices are pretty affordable, for 234$ I can buy new entry level one together with Ortophone cartridge.

But I like more sophistication, more technology, I like things to be substantiated.

I have this player Yamaha CDX-993 [English] - a Yamaha 993 - it has overwhelming parameters, extremely low THD, powerful 20 bit DAC that handles 16 bit CD's and 20 bit DDD records equally well.

And the purpose to buy a turntable is to beat it :D From what I read a good stable turntable such as the SL-1200 with a good cartridge should beat most if not all CD Players...

So let's simplify the question - will the Technics SL-1200 beat the Yamaha CDX-993 - if the answer is Yes, I will be satisfied!

And another question, will be the Yamaha C-85 preamp be good enough for the purpose? http://lh3.ggpht.com/_Wbvv9PgiQNI/Sq8b4B5fc9I/AAAAAAAABuE/DXEn9NKR4BA/IMG_2335.JPG

Phono MM 2,5mV/100 Ohm, 47 KOhm, MC 100µV/100 Ohm, 1 KOhm

I also have a Yamaha RX-497 and two Pioneer receivers one of which vintage from the 70's and a behringer VMX-100 mixer all with phono inputs, but only the C-85 has a selector.

After all the Technics has extremely stable rotation speed - fluctuations are under 0.02% and the vibrations are low too, one of the higher models of Pro-Ject which is already more expensive than the Technics has 0.5% speed variations and worse db figure for vibrations... it was something like -73db against -78 for the Technics... So why buy a more expensive equipment with worse parameters? The less expensive Pro-Jects are with even worse parameters. After all the anti-skating system of those is with weight attached to a small thread and hanging freely :confused:

And apart from that a turntable has 2-3 measurable parameters, all the rest is accounted to the cartridge. And I will buy a 40 dollar cartridge and a 200 dollar cartridge...
 

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I think the prospect of the vinyl playback "beating" your digital source depends on the whole system (turntable, tonearm, cartridge, MC stepup (assuming you go MC) and RIAA preamp. Of those elements my experience is that the cartridge and signal conditioning play the stronger role assuming your turntable and arm are reasonably competent and the arm is compatible with the cartridge. I would expect the SL-1200 to satisfy the reasonably competent standard for the turntable and tonearm. I would take your cartidge budget and invest it in one good cartridge rather than two. In the end my experience is that vinyl can outdo digital, but the source material and your personal tolerance for vinyl's surface noise can override the equipment choices.:cool:
 
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