EXAR XR2206P

Has anyone used the the XR2206P in a design before? Interested in the groups thoughts on the chip. Thanks.

For those not familiar, here is a description from the datasheet:

"The XR-2206 is a monolithic function generator
integrated circuit capable of producing high quality sine,
square, triangle, ramp, and pulse waveforms of
high-stability and accuracy. The output waveforms can be
both amplitude and frequency modulated by an external
voltage. Frequency of operation can be selected
externally over a range of 0.01Hz to more than 1MHz.

The circuit is ideally suited for communications,
instrumentation, and function generator applications
requiring sinusoidal tone, AM, FM, or FSK generation. It
has a typical drift specification of 20ppm/°C. The oscillator
frequency can be linearly swept over a 2000:1 frequency
range with an external control voltage, while maintaining
low distortion."
 

anatech

Administrator
Paid Member
2004-06-06 8:31 pm
Georgetown, On
Hi Chris,
I have, and also the XR8038. You can find these chips used in the commercial function generators, the more economical models.

They work fine, as advertised. The app notes you can find on the 'net. I would suggest also looking into the service manuals for the function generators to see how it was used in those. I can't think of model numbers off the top of my head at the moment.

There are some kits based on these two ICs as well. If you need to buy the IC and build your own generator, I would highly recommend that you buy a kit containing the IC you want to use. Then use that to learn how the ICs work as there are adjustments you can make on the kits. You can learn how to properly sweep the frequency, output voltage and just general techniques for modulation or even CW use.

Once you have built the kit, and "played" with it, you'll be in a far better position to design your own ideas.

-Chris
 
Hi Chris,
I have, and also the XR8038. You can find these chips used in the commercial function generators, the more economical models.

They work fine, as advertised. The app notes you can find on the 'net. I would suggest also looking into the service manuals for the function generators to see how it was used in those. I can't think of model numbers off the top of my head at the moment.

There are some kits based on these two ICs as well. If you need to buy the IC and build your own generator, I would highly recommend that you buy a kit containing the IC you want to use. Then use that to learn how the ICs work as there are adjustments you can make on the kits. You can learn how to properly sweep the frequency, output voltage and just general techniques for modulation or even CW use.

Once you have built the kit, and "played" with it, you'll be in a far better position to design your own ideas.

-Chris

I am currently using the Intersil ICLD8038CCPD. How would you compare/contrast the XR2206P to the ICLD8038CCPD? Thanks.
 

anatech

Administrator
Paid Member
2004-06-06 8:31 pm
Georgetown, On
Hi Chris,
Similar chips. Each have their own idiosyncrasies and both generate rough sine waves. Which one I would use depended mostly on availability or circuit boards.

I don't really favor one over the other, and really didn't pay much attention to them as my needs where custom. They didn't produce clean sine waves, but the triangle and square waves were more what I used. I can't remember which one, but it used to put a tiny "pip" at the top and bottom of since waves. This is due to how they created a sine wave - from the triangle wave. The "pip" was the peak of the triangle wave.

What were you going to use this for? If for sine wave, they could both be swept across a great frequency range. The sine was normally below 1% THD if you fine tuned the circuit. A 0.5% THD sine wave was it's mid-range performance. More than good enough to use as a signal for audio function testing. Not good enough to measure distortion though.

-Chris
 
Hi Chris,
Similar chips. Each have their own idiosyncrasies and both generate rough sine waves. Which one I would use depended mostly on availability or circuit boards.

I don't really favor one over the other, and really didn't pay much attention to them as my needs where custom. They didn't produce clean sine waves, but the triangle and square waves were more what I used. I can't remember which one, but it used to put a tiny "pip" at the top and bottom of since waves. This is due to how they created a sine wave - from the triangle wave. The "pip" was the peak of the triangle wave.

What were you going to use this for? If for sine wave, they could both be swept across a great frequency range. The sine was normally below 1% THD if you fine tuned the circuit. A 0.5% THD sine wave was it's mid-range performance. More than good enough to use as a signal for audio function testing. Not good enough to measure distortion though.

-Chris

Thank you for your thoughts, Chris. My intent is to see how they holdup in Audio and Gaussian Frequency-shift keying applications. Have you used either of these for FSK applications?

Chris