Energy S10.3 subwoofer LED light replacement?

kuer

Member
2014-07-29 12:53 pm
I have an Energy S10.3 subwoofer, the front Led blue light blew out, which seems a very common issue on this series.

I plan to replace it, but don't know spec or model of the led light.

Searched online, found out " you just need to insert a general purpose diode in series with the LED, such as an inexpensive 1N4148 ($0.05). And, of course, any readily available 3V, 5mm, through-hole round blue LED (I think crystal clear should be better). "

Please advise me if I can use the instruction above to do that?

Thanks.
 

MAAC0

Member
2010-05-02 10:00 pm
If you insert a diode in series, you are dropping 0,7V to the led.
It makes sense if you a feeding the led with AC or poor rectified supply.
I suppose your led feeding voltage is DC.

First measure the voltage feeding the led with the voltmeter. There should be a current limiting resistor before it. Measure before the resistor and ground (I mean the other leg where the led connects because it can be + referenced) Now calculate the resistor value for say 15mA for 3mm or 20mA for 4mm and add another resistor in series to get the desired value or substitute it with the new resistor.
Get a standard blue led and replace.

For 20V I would try a 1k or 1K2 (safer) resistor 20/1000=.02 A(20mA) for current limiting.

Slight changes on the resistor value affects led brightness too, but don't exceed 20mA or it will burn again.

Electronics Club - LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes)
 

kuer

Member
2014-07-29 12:53 pm
If you insert a diode in series, you are dropping 0,7V to the led.
It makes sense if you a feeding the led with AC or poor rectified supply.
I suppose your led feeding voltage is DC.

First measure the voltage feeding the led with the voltmeter. There should be a current limiting resistor before it. Measure before the resistor and ground (I mean the other leg where the led connects because it can be + referenced) Now calculate the resistor value for say 15mA for 3mm or 20mA for 4mm and add another resistor in series to get the desired value or substitute it with the new resistor.
Get a standard blue led and replace.

For 20V I would try a 1k or 1K2 (safer) resistor 20/1000=.02 A(20mA) for current limiting.

Slight changes on the resistor value affects led brightness too, but don't exceed 20mA or it will burn again.

Electronics Club - LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes)

Thank for your help. I made it with the way online, believe your mothed work well too.