DIY CD Clarifier (pics)

After having heard improvements in clarity after "treating" CDs with my old head demagnatiser (I no longer own a tape deck.) I decided to build a motorised solution inspired by the commercial CD clarifier.
A surplus CD motor, a self gripping spindle from a broken lap top CD drive, transformer, push down toggle and some caps and bridge wee glued and cable tied into a plastic box. The results are good!!!!

Here are some pics.
 

Attachments

  • p1020578.jpg
    p1020578.jpg
    19.8 KB · Views: 1,081

Shoog

Member
2002-08-15 10:16 pm
Eire
I like the work on the aparatus, and I also find the patent interesting. However an aparatus doesn't require you to prove its effectiveness to apply for a patent (or am I wrong).
Has it been demonstrated scientifically that CD's become magnitised and that this has an effect on the "tone" ? Can anyone point me to a paper on the proven principle. I am genuinely interested, and hence my restraint in my original statement.

Shoog
 
No scientific clue......
Heard the Bedini years ago and tried my old head demag thingy and heard the same kind of difference.
Just decided to make it more user friendly.....

The difference is varied depending on discs treated (play times maybe) but afeter reading the patent notes I am going to treat discs upside down (mag field will then be closer to label side) and hear what happens....

This audio game is just bizarre.....
 

SY

diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
2002-10-24 10:19 pm
Chicagoland
www.SYclotron.com
Shoog said:
I like the work on the aparatus, and I also find the patent interesting. However an aparatus doesn't require you to prove its effectiveness to apply for a patent (or am I wrong).

You are not wrong. Not only that, but it doesn't have to actually work for a patent to be granted. There's patents on all kinds of outrageous nonsense.
 

Shoog

Member
2002-08-15 10:16 pm
Eire
I read the article on the chip thing. Not at all enlightening as to how a magnetic clarifier would work as they are using entirely different principles. Not entirely convinced by the scientific babble about the chip, I understand the principles he is describing - but in relation to a CD I think hes pulling our legs.

The real problem with verifying the worth of any of these devises is that audio memory is so short term. Simple taking the CD out of the CD player, having just listened to it, and "clarifying it", and then popping it back in - the chances of really remembering the difference is tiny, if it at all subtle. The user expectation of an improvement is likely to swamp any actual change.

Shoog