Dipole subwoofer for to be used in nearfield?

hedphones

Member
2013-02-11 3:25 pm
Hi,

I was asking if anyone had experience in using an H-baffled - or similar subwoofer in nearfield application?

I would like to add some bass to my current monitors (Genelec 8020) and I would buy the matching 7050B sub instantly, but I know it won't respond well to my less-than-ideal room acoustics..

Hence I got an idea of making a H-baffled 12" dipole sub. I was thinking of crossing it over at 150hz or 200hz with DSP.

I would place it on my desk, thus distance from the sub to listener would be 1 meter or less!

Please give your opinions of such setup. Worth trying or not. I'm only expecting output to 40hz, and have no need for high SPL's.
 
This is my desktop setup. goes down to 40Hz at 80db.
Sounds amazing!

20121216_155831_zps971367e3.jpg


20121216_155703_zps1404fcbd.jpg
 

ScottG

Member
2003-02-04 12:23 am
US
Hi,

I was asking if anyone had experience in using an H-baffled - or similar subwoofer in nearfield application?

I would like to add some bass to my current monitors (Genelec 8020) and I would buy the matching 7050B sub instantly, but I know it won't respond well to my less-than-ideal room acoustics..

Hence I got an idea of making a H-baffled 12" dipole sub. I was thinking of crossing it over at 150hz or 200hz with DSP.

I would place it on my desk, thus distance from the sub to listener would be 1 meter or less!

Please give your opinions of such setup. Worth trying or not. I'm only expecting output to 40hz, and have no need for high SPL's.


A single sub that close or not doesn't really matter a lot.

Now *two* dipole subs in stereo (L & R) that close, depending on their placement/proximity relative to you can make a difference.

One of the nice things here is that no matter the design, you'll get a "boost" in sp at lower freq.s when less than 3 feet.

If it's not a stereo sub (ie. single sub with summed input), then I'd suggest a location immediately behind your seated position with a proper phase adjustment. It can be any sort of design you want. However a dipole sub like this can lead to lower pressure leakage into adjoining rooms, making it a "quieter" solution.
 
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Hi,

I was asking if anyone had experience in using an H-baffled - or similar subwoofer in nearfield application?

I would like to add some bass to my current monitors (Genelec 8020) and I would buy the matching 7050B sub instantly, but I know it won't respond well to my less-than-ideal room acoustics..

Hence I got an idea of making a H-baffled 12" dipole sub. I was thinking of crossing it over at 150hz or 200hz with DSP.

I would place it on my desk, thus distance from the sub to listener would be 1 meter or less!

Please give your opinions of such setup. Worth trying or not. I'm only expecting output to 40hz, and have no need for high SPL's.

1m might be too far away, the room will probably already show its ugly face. It's better to place the sub as close as possible behind the head.

Please see Comparison of different near field and far field subwoofer configurations
 

ScottG

Member
2003-02-04 12:23 am
US
I was thinking of a bandpass sub that is very wide but not very deep, with the opening running across the width of the couch.

That would also be good, but I don't think it would have quite the visual interest of the stacked ripole. (..I've done this with several designs before, but never a ripole. The one I liked best, personally, was the T-line.)

..sort of like the difference between a watch and a skeleton watch, where with the skeleton watch you can see the mechanical structure of the watch.

The only other thing is that ripole will be easier on the neighbors or household.
 
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ORNJ

Member
2011-03-15 11:02 pm
CA
Not to hijack this thread, but I have been thinking about a dipole subwoofer for my family room with a pair of 15 or 18 drivers in what I believe is called a "V" frame(LX521).

Does such a system even work for a family room or do you have to be sitting really close?

My wife does not care for how much rattle the current sub produces and from what I understand the dipole sub approach does not create as much.

The listening is all done on a single couch that the sub can be "aimed" at.
 

ScottG

Member
2003-02-04 12:23 am
US
Not to hijack this thread, but I have been thinking about a dipole subwoofer for my family room with a pair of 15 or 18 drivers in what I believe is called a "V" frame(LX521).

Does such a system even work for a family room or do you have to be sitting really close?

My wife does not care for how much rattle the current sub produces and from what I understand the dipole sub approach does not create as much.

The listening is all done on a single couch that the sub can be "aimed" at.

It works for the LX521 - it should work for you. :) (..sitting really close usually references a lower freq. response that actually behaves more like stereo for a single listener with directive designs like dipoles. It also helps with dynamics and power requirements.)

Note that it may work really well for only one position on the couch however, but something like Room EQ Wizard can help with an average of locations on the couch.

For linearity with respect to listener position Geddes's multi-monopole sub setup is better option, but it's not going to net you the favorable advantage that you are specifically asking for here.
 
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