Damaged dome, what should I do.

I've got some new Logitech speakers(crap) and one of the satellite speaker felt on the floor and the dome of one of the two drivers had some damage. When the speaker is not much but enough(4w max) loud, I hear distortion coming from that particular satellite.

Would you tell me to ask at the shop if I can return the speakers or to exchange the satellites with the shop's demo?

Logitech only offers complete product replacement and have no spare parts.(If you break a part of it, buy a new one) Also, product replacement is only offered if the product had a manfuacture problem.

If nothing works, could I try to create a manufacturing problem? (Removing solder somewhere so that sound is intermittent...)

Or, finally, should I try to repair it?
 

Vikash

diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
2003-05-17 9:08 pm
UK
www.vikash.info
You could also search for the posts with other possible answers to this age old question :rolleyes:

I prefer using some tape (for non paper material domes).

And the W3-871s doesn't have a dome.

Edit: reading the original post again, it doesn't sound like it's a dust cap problem.
If nothing works, could I try to create a manufacturing problem? (Removing solder somewhere so that sound is intermittent...)
Nor do we condone such fraudulent activities.
 
Yes, it's a dustcap problem, but if I can't get the dustcap out, I'd create a supposed manufacturing problem because the warranty only applies on these kind of problems and I would get a product replacement.

The speakers in question are X-530 (70$CAD)

the W3-871s has a dustcap from Tangband picture.

There are 2x ~2" drivers in each satellites, so it's in the W2 or W23 series.
 
Logitech has one model with a known TB driver (and it is a 3"). The others i don't know.

Given the way TB (and most Chinese OEMs) works these are all likely a driver built specifically for logitech -- the entire thing is bought complete from a chinese OEM for cheap-cheap-cheap. (CAD $70 probably means that the OEM cost is under $20 for the lot (FOB China) so it isn't worthwhile for them to try to stock spare parts -- given the volume they would be more expensive than replacements.

If you have a good dealer they may get them replaced under waranty (be honest thou), if not time to dissassemble and see if you can suss out the problem -- if they got a good enuff knock you may have shifted a magnet and they are toast.

dave
 
pinkmouse said:
...Or just build some real speakers...;)


Well...........That too. :)

I built a CHEAP satellite using a TangBand W4-656SB 4"er and a cheap audix TM010IY1 tweeter. I built it in a cardboard tube that came with a JBL C8R2241 re-cone kit. Add an inductor to the woofer and a cap to the tweeter (whatever I had on hand......can't remember the values), and the thing actually sounds really good. I use it to listen to NPR at work during the day. Everyone that sees it can't believe how good it sounds for what it is. I am even surprised myself.

Cheers,
Zach
 

ShinOBIWAN

diyAudio Member
2004-02-25 9:13 pm
UK
Vikash said:
If nothing works, could I try to create a manufacturing problem? (Removing solder somewhere so that sound is intermittent...)
Nor do we condone such fraudulent activities.

:D :D :D

I did this to a Tiny 42" plasma screen after numerous picture problems such as tearing on pans.

Had no joy getting a refund or a replacement because it was apparently a 'design limitation of the tech'. So I created a fault of my own out of sheer despairation using a PC PSU's 12v rail in combination with sensitive IC's. Sent it back under the 14day right to refund if faulty and got my money back :)

The Panasonic that replaced it has no such tearing problems, so their rubbish about inherent limitations of the technology was clearly a cover up for poor design and/or cheap electronics. Eitherway I took the risk and came out smiling, I wouldn't recommend it unless very desperate and you've tried everything else such as the Citizens Advice, Trading Standard etc.

EDIT: I see that you've actually dropped the speaker yourself, which means you've got no right to a replacement. You'll just have to put it down to experience and move on.
 

ShinOBIWAN

diyAudio Member
2004-02-25 9:13 pm
UK
soongsc said:
In Taiwan, consumers have the right to return any electronic product within 7 days as long as they don't like it. In the US I think there are lots of stores that do that too.

We have something similar over here but it only covers internet or mail order goods since you can't really access the suitability of these goods until they arrive. Your also covered for 30 days, I think, if you bought with a credit card and not debit/cash. If you bought in store your at the mercy of their policies. The good ones do operate such schemes such as Richersounds offer a 14day no quibble money back guarantee - very helpful if you decide that it wasn't for you.
 

soongsc

Member
2005-03-26 2:31 pm
Taiwan
ShinOBIWAN said:


We have something similar over here but it only covers internet or mail order goods since you can't really access the suitability of these goods until they arrive. Your also covered for 30 days, I think, if you bought with a credit card and not debit/cash. If you bought in store your at the mercy of their policies. The good ones do operate such schemes such as Richersounds offer a 14day no quibble money back guarantee - very helpful if you decide that it wasn't for you.

Some cases possibly you are not able to access all the functions in the store. For example, some CD players will tell you they play HDCD, but in fact they do not have HDCD decoding capability. HDCD disks can be played on normal CD players. Would you still be at the mercy of store policy? Another example would be published specs. If you ask them the test conditions of a speaker FR, and they can't tell you it, then you take it back and you measure it and listen to it at home and you don't like the quality or the test results, can you return it?
 

ShinOBIWAN

diyAudio Member
2004-02-25 9:13 pm
UK
soongsc said:


Some cases possibly you are not able to access all the functions in the store. For example, some CD players will tell you they play HDCD, but in fact they do not have HDCD decoding capability. HDCD disks can be played on normal CD players. Would you still be at the mercy of store policy? Another example would be published specs. If you ask them the test conditions of a speaker FR, and they can't tell you it, then you take it back and you measure it and listen to it at home and you don't like the quality or the test results, can you return it?

Such quibbles over here can only be settled by the use of an independant test engineer. Meaning you have to have the product's discrepancy proffessionally investigated should you and the manufacturer have conflicting views.

Unfortunately they aren't cheap but fortunately the cost are passed on to the manufacturer should your claim for defects be upheld by the engineers report in a claims court.

I had to go through all this with that plasma screen and in the end took my fate into my own hands :)