crossover calculator

In my four ways system I want make a passive line level crossover (pllxo) to compare with my active xo now I use. Since the frequency cut are first order 200h-1000-5000hz I have to use the normal high pass, low pass calculator or the narrow band pass filter?
From what I understand from here: http://www.the12volt.com/caraudio/crosscalc.asp#cc
I have to use the high and low pass calculator for woofers and tweeters and narrow band pass calculator for mid-low and mid high.
I'm correct?
 

acid_k2

Member
2006-10-03 12:56 pm
hi patriz

a passive line level crossover is a filter (or a series of filters) made tipically with low-power resistors (no inductor) and capacitors. It's not a very common solution, because you have loss in the signal due to the attenuation of resistors.


the on-line calculator you suggest is for "power" crossover (placed between amplifier and the set of loudspeakers), with a low input an low output impedence. If you use it with a line level inpedence (example 10 k ohm) you'll obtain very large values of inductors and capacitors.

ps: i strongly suggest not to use the Narrow Band Pass Filters, that is non-linear in a wide range of frequencies, but a Low Pass Filters followed by an High Pass Filters
 

1s2m3n

Member
2011-03-28 7:24 pm
for passive LC pllxo

hi patriz
Always take into account that the chock is non ideal inductor with respect wire resistance witch make calculations very different to a normal LC passive crossover with loudspeaker for load
a passive line level crossover is a filter (or a series of filters) made tipically with low-power resistors (no inductor) and capacitors. It's not a very common solution, because you have loss in the signal due to the attenuation of resistors.


the on-line calculator you suggest is for "power" crossover (placed between amplifier and the set of loudspeakers), with a low input an low output impedence. If you use it with a line level inpedence (example 10 k ohm) you'll obtain very large values of inductors and capacitors.

ps: i strongly suggest not to use the Narrow Band Pass Filters, that is non-linear in a wide range of frequencies, but a Low Pass Filters followed by an High Pass Filters