Chip amp output for speakers

I have a pair of MTM rs180 speakers

Interesting (my compulsive answer to the question : one driver-one amp )
look at what the designer wrote about the load characteristic:
Here is the input impedance of the speaker. Pretty typical curve, but definitely should be treated as a 4 ohm load.
Which leads to...
And....
Then... ( I've read that a good MTM still needs to be 3-way :rolleyes::D:eek: )
Moreover.....
don't ask me! ? !
:rolleyes:
 
50W amplifier is a good guide but anywhere from 25W to 100W would be appropriate for a genuine 50W speaker.

But a far bigger problem is how honest the retailer is being in describing it as a 50W speaker.

If that were a peak rating then the real rating is about 13W,
If that were a music programme rating then the real rating would be about 25W.
Now the amp capability would need to be reduced by 50% or by 75% from that original guide power rating.
 
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macson

Member
2012-03-07 10:53 pm
london
Thanks for the replies - I was concerned with the fact each speaker had 2 woofer drives in them (rated at 60w rms each?) so does this in effect mean the speaker would need about 120watts per channel ideally from an amp or would a 68w per channel chip amp still be powerful enough? Thanks.
 

Tekko

Banned
2005-01-01 3:33 pm
A LM3886 per channel will be plenty! If you want, you can use two of them per channel, run one of the woofers and the tweeter with one and the second woofer with the other, that will be the same thing as using a twice as powerful amp to run both woofers in parallel.

The LM3886 is a really good sounding ic amp that is also really dependable, reliable and robust, really hard to damage.
 

picbuck

Member
2008-05-31 12:50 pm
<< I was concerned with the fact each speaker had 2 woofer drives in them (rated at 60w rms each?) so does this in effect mean the speaker would need about 120watts per channel >>

All of the above remaining true, if you hooked a 120 watt amp into two-60 watt speakers, then the full power of the amp would be available to each speaker. With the obvious result of smoke.

That is, again obviously, unless you had control circuitry to prevent that, which would be complicated to say the least. The still-obvious bottom line is that the rating of any one speaker rules.

Of course, many argue that the best setup is two or three amps, one for midrange and one for highs, perhaps with a subwoofer. But that's a different subject entirely.
 

Arty

Member
2011-02-24 5:04 pm
hmm, well prehaps " if you hooked a 120 watt amp into two-60 watt speakers" even this is managable. 120 watt amp rated at 4 ohm, and two-16 ohm rated woofers in paralell at full power will not smoke , given a box aligment enabling them to handle 60 watt of power.

not offending or trolling, sry if -at first sigt- might look like that.
my point is that it is simply impossible to judge from just the rated powers.
rated power of an amp is given for a load, i might sometimes would prefer if contious current ability would be marked, and maximum voltage swing at output.
as for speakers, well the rated impedance means nothing. The impedance curve would tell more, along with a graph showing the maximum powerhandling (input watts vs freq. chart, long term power that is, not just some fragment of a secund) , and to figure out if its loud or not a well sepicifed SPL graph (marking if it was mesured at half or full or quarter space, naturaly) woudl enable to tell if speaker X will "blend" with amp Y.

otherwise its mostly shooting in the dark.