center image,what makes for a good solid one in our boxes.Does box material makes ad

Status
This old topic is closed. If you want to reopen this topic, contact a moderator using the "Report Post" button.

eriksquires

Member
2013-05-10 4:11 pm
Driver matching and lack of reflections. I don't think the materials of the box matter per se so much as avoiding resonances as much as possible. However, if both are equally resonant then they should produce the same imaging in the center.

Resonant cabinets, I would think, should more greatly affect the overall smearing of detail and coloring of the sound. I also think that there may be some benefit to that center imaging by reducing the treble relative to the midrange. I'm not suggesting you SHOULD do this, but that in my experience reducing the treble accentuates instrument imaging, perhaps artificially.

If any of that is true, then minimizing resonances in the midrange is probably a good idea.

Best,


Erik
 
Generally, as much as possible for early reflections (go for 20dB or better). Then, something like 10dB below the first arrival for diffuse reflections after about 10 to 20msec. Pretty hard to do, for diffuse reflections, I actually have an article in the newest Linear Audio about a way to get it without covering the room in huge diffusors..

The numbers are based loosely on what LEDE rmastering rooms used to go for. I've read that they don't do that so much anymore as it tended to make recording sound TOO good (not advantage for the mixing/mastering guys, as they have to account for typical rooms, cars, headphones, etc). But that isn't a problem for listening rooms.

The directivity can be doubly helpful as it keeps down near reflections and lets you point the fly-by energy behind or beside you into a far diffusor.
 
Driver matching and lack of reflections. I don't think the materials of the box matter per se so much as avoiding resonances as much as possible. However, if both are equally resonant then they should produce the same imaging in the center.

Resonant cabinets, I would think, should more greatly affect the overall smearing of detail and coloring of the sound. I also think that there may be some benefit to that center imaging by reducing the treble relative to the midrange. I'm not suggesting you SHOULD do this, but that in my experience reducing the treble accentuates instrument imaging, perhaps artificially.

If any of that is true, then minimizing resonances in the midrange is probably a good idea.

Best,


Erik

In my opinion any resonances in the box itself should be avoided as much as possible as they tend to give away queue's of loudspeaker position. Play a mono track, nothing should hint at sound from side positions.
Obviously the balance between left and right FR becomes quite important to achieve that too.
Along with the avoidance of those early reflections bwaslo mentions:

Generally, as much as possible for early reflections (go for 20dB or better). Then, something like 10dB below the first arrival for diffuse reflections after about 10 to 20msec. Pretty hard to do, for diffuse reflections, I actually have an article in the newest Linear Audio about a way to get it without covering the room in huge diffusors..

The numbers are based loosely on what LEDE mastering rooms used to go for. I've read that they don't do that so much anymore as it tended to make recording sound TOO good (not advantage for the mixing/mastering guys, as they have to account for typical rooms, cars, headphones, etc). But that isn't a problem for listening rooms.

The directivity can be doubly helpful as it keeps down near reflections and lets you point the fly-by energy behind or beside you into a far diffusor.

I couldn't agree more. Even though I "fake" the late reflections to have more control over their FR spectrum. It was one of my most valuable and rewarding experiments. Those late reflections can have a rather large effect on overall tonality.

I'd love to read that article...
 
Status
This old topic is closed. If you want to reopen this topic, contact a moderator using the "Report Post" button.