Burson Audio Opamps V5i in Aiyima A04

Burson audio sent me a pair of these opamps to try out. Here are my listening impressions. First, gear used. I used the opamps in an Aiyima A04, a fairly popular small Class D amp. My speakers are Focal 133's, custom Zalytrons from the 90's with Focal drivers; 7” double voice coil kevlar woofers and 1” titanium tweeters in a vented 15 litre box. I've used them for over 20 years as critical reference for test mixes. Mistakes are obvious, but when everything's right they are a dream. My source is a PC playing digital mp3's at 320 kbps 48 kHz. I had previously replaced the stock opamps in the aiyima with OPA1656's.

The Burson opamps come in a tidy package, snugged into a thick slab of rubber which fits in a small custom plastic hinged box. They are encased in metal and were extremely easy to slip into the amp's sockets. Once the top was off, 30 seconds for the entire operation. As soon as I put on the first track I was gobsmacked by highs. Really bright and nowhere near the bottom I was used to. But incredible soundstage. So I let them run for a week before listening critically. After 60 or so hours they had smoothed out nicely. All the bass was back. But they still had somewhat edgy highs. I listen to mostly jazz, which can run the gamut. But acoustic stuff is my favorite. What knocked me out was the great ambience. Reflections in the room were clearly more obvious. After a couple of weeks listening to the broken in chips the overall sound still strikes me as too bright for my ears. The OPA1656's just sound wonderful and non fatiguing. The Burson chips seem to have more pizazz but I get a sensation of earache almost right away. I've always been sensitive to midrange and that may be part of it. Guitars usually seem over mixed to me. If you're into electronic music they may be just the ticket.
 

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How do you imagine an opamp of any sort can lack bass and slowly recover it? It can only sense the instantaneous error voltage at the input, it has no way to know what part of that is low frequency components and what part is high frequency!!!


Frequency response of an opamp circuit is set by the feedback network, not the opamp.


Perhaps if you'd measured the frequency reponse you'd have found it was stable over time and you imagined the change?
 

Victorinox

Member
2008-01-23 7:54 am
How do you imagine an opamp of any sort can lack bass and slowly recover it? It can only sense the instantaneous error voltage at the input, it has no way to know what part of that is low frequency components and what part is high frequency!!!


Frequency response of an opamp circuit is set by the feedback network, not the opamp.


Perhaps if you'd measured the frequency reponse you'd have found it was stable over time and you imagined the change?


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