• WARNING: Tube/Valve amplifiers use potentially LETHAL HIGH VOLTAGES.
    Building, troubleshooting and testing of these amplifiers should only be
    performed by someone who is thoroughly familiar with
    the safety precautions around high voltages.

Boxing Day Special

Hi All:

Merry Ho-Ho and all that :santa2:

I finally got back into my shop after a month of home renos and other obnoxious chores :(

So, I decided to finish up a project that has been sitting gathering dust for several months - a rebuild of my 1957 Electrohome 6BQ5 P-P 'slave amp'. This started life as the power stage in a console hi-fi. It got me re-started in audio after a 15-year absence, and I am sorta' fond of it.

The rebuild consisted of new caps, tube sockets, input jacks and output terminals (replaced phenolic screw strips with fancy new binding posts). Added an on/off switch and indicator lite and then painted it with NOS 'spackle' paint. A pretty surround from rock maple (thanks, Jerry) and it has become what you see.

Nothing serious here, guys - just a bit of eye candy :)
BTW - it does sound quite good - no all thyat far behind by 300B SET.




[IMGHTTPDEAD]http://www.alertbay.com/living-audio/ehome1.JPG[/IMGHTTPDEAD]
 
That paint is not thermo conductive, unfortunately...

Youré right, but the trafos in this amp do not get hot - neither do the caps - so it's not a problem. In the pix it has been runniong for 8 hours straight and no discoloration, so no heat issues.
The paint is, however, quite good for mechanical damping.

Another problem is that it is soft, and will scrape off easily, so the unit must be handled with care.
 

kuroguy

Member
2007-09-08 4:32 am
HollowState said:
Jesse, this is the first time I've said this to a member, but I don't like it. It just looks wrong to me. I guess I'm too traditional. I'd rather have seen the transformers removed and painted. The capacitors buffed and polished and the chassis painted separately, but not with that speckled stuff. Sorry, I'm not trying to be mean.
I have to agree. That wood looks great, but it looks like someone vomited on your amp.

No offense. DIY is all about experimenting. Sometimes you you're the bird. Sometimes you're the worm.
 

kevinkr

Administrator
Paid Member
HollowState said:
Jesse, this is the first time I've said this to a member, but I don't like it. It just looks wrong to me. I guess I'm too traditional. I'd rather have seen the transformers removed and painted. The capacitors buffed and polished and the chassis painted separately, but not with that speckled stuff. Sorry, I'm not trying to be mean.


kuroguy said:

I have to agree. That wood looks great, but it looks like someone vomited on your amp.

No offense. DIY is all about experimenting. Sometimes you you're the bird. Sometimes you're the worm.

I think that's kinda mean actually..

My only concern would be that it will not adhere long term to the transformers and caps, and it does seem rather fragile. The main thing is how it sounds, and it does look interesting. ;)
 

kuroguy

Member
2007-09-08 4:32 am
My apologies. I didn't intend to be mean. I think that tube amps are as much about the sound as they are the look. these pieces of equipment tend to be display pieces. in some cases pieces of art. You did it right with the wood surround and likely the sound, but I get the feeling that you got into a bit of a hurry and used the only spray paint you had. I've done that before and thought the exact same about some of my projects in the past.

Again, Sorry if I was rude or mean.
 
How about using some phosphorescent paint with a dusting on top of those tiny glass beads used for making decorative candles or sometimes for special sand blasting. Maybe use different phosphor colors on different chassis components. Then some UV LEDs to illuminate the phosphors.

To be even more gaudy, try some of those thermal draft candle spinners mounted on top of the tubes. OK, that was over the top.

Don :cool:
 
Hi Guys:
Thanks for all your comments. I don't think any of them are mean. I love the feedback.

The paint job is an experiment. Considering what this chassis looked like in its original galvanizing, it looks great now.

I tried black enamel, but it looked boooooring!!! :xeye:

I got several cans of the spackle paint form a sale at our local general store's hardware dept. I am fairly sure that is it more than 20 years old, so I was amazed that it even set up. I have Green, black with blue and white flecks in it, red (yech!) and the lovely vomit color you see above.

Thanks for the suggestion about clear laquer, pikkujöpö. I might do that if I decide to keep it this finish.

I am delighted that it has provokes so many comments. If we don't try it, how will we know? :D
 
I quite like the vomit look

Wow, somebody besides me likes it! :)

I have been trying different looks in enclosures for a while now. Remember my native-carved chipamp - and of course the Yellow-Cedar linestage that can be seen in the first photo.

My next project is a single-ended KT88 amp on an open plate chassis made from 1/2" (13mm) plate aluminum. I expect this to look sort of Techn cum Art Deco, but who can tell until its done.

Cheers
 
Aaah...I was wondering what wood that was. I love wood! Including the base for the amp. What is it? It looks like some type of burl grain. And what are those numbers in the window on the line amp if I might ask?

The rack is made from pine - laminated together with epoxy. The shelves are hollow and filled with medium grain sand (they weigh about 30lbs each).

The Line amp is, as said, west coast yellow cedar (cabinet work made by Scott :worship: ) The innards can be seen at:

http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=111714&highlight=

The wood base for the vomit amp is rock maple, built and finished by Jerry. :up:

Me love wood too :D
 
Sorry, Victor. Forgot to answer your question about the numbers in the window...

The linestage is remote controlled (I'm getting lazy) , with 4 inputs, volume, mute. The numbers are the input in use, with a little green LED above each.

Rustoleum makes several shades of hammer tone paint.
Yeah, and I do love the stuff. However it has been done before and this time I wanted to do something different. ;)