AR XA Turntable Motor Wiring

Duke58

Member
2009-01-03 8:00 pm
I bought a new Hurst motor for my AR XA turntable and started to replace it, but have a question.

If C-2 is added between the yellow and black wires per the attached drawing, won't there be power on the motor at all times, even when the switch is "off"?
 

Attachments

  • Screen Shot 2020-01-12 at 12.32.42 PM.png
    Screen Shot 2020-01-12 at 12.32.42 PM.png
    234.8 KB · Views: 361
A typical value for turn off pop capacitor c2 is .01 uf, 1000 v. Transients on a 120 vac line can be 1300 v from the turn off of a air conditioner/refrigerator motor.
1000 v caps are difficult to buy these days. Highest I could get from newark was 500 v. In that case you can parallel the cap with a mov supressor rated 300 vac or so. Metal oxide voltage suppressor. Not invented when AR turntable came out.
You could use a x2 cap which is rated by the normal line voltage used, but they aren't typically stocked in .01 uf.
 

decommo

Member
2019-09-02 11:59 pm
Hello,

Instead of opening new thread, I found this thread which is directly related to my question hence posting here and ask for advice.

I recently got AR XB turntable without original Haydon motor and got brand new Hurst 3001-001 motor to install which I was told that good replacement motor.

The question is that I reside in 230v 50Hz AC main environment and I read somewhere that Hurst motor uses different value of capacitors against Haydon motor.

Does anyone know what value of capacitors to use for 230v AC main? The pulley is designed for 50Hz so just need to figure out how to wire the motor with correct value of capacitors to use.

The existing capacitors currently installed is 0.39MFD 600VDC and 0.01MFD 600VDC which are old so may need to be replaced.

Thank you very much..

Haydon Motor wiring.jpeg
 

Duke58

Member
2009-01-03 8:00 pm
Does the voltage at your house measure 220 volts? Here in the USA, it varies. At my home, it measures 122.3 Vac. It can vary by +/- a few volts depending on time of year. With turntables, that's why speed controllers are made. I can only tell the difference in sound if I accidentally put the speed on 45 rpm when playing a 33 1/3 rpm LP.

We have a lot of equipment at my former workplace that ran fine on 220Vac when the actual voltage was measured at 230 Vac. Those are motors for machine tools and I couldn't hear any difference with those motors as well. :)
 

decommo

Member
2019-09-02 11:59 pm
Does the voltage at your house measure 220 volts? Here in the USA, it varies. At my home, it measures 122.3 Vac. It can vary by +/- a few volts depending on time of year. With turntables, that's why speed controllers are made. I can only tell the difference in sound if I accidentally put the speed on 45 rpm when playing a 33 1/3 rpm LP.

We have a lot of equipment at my former workplace that ran fine on 220Vac when the actual voltage was measured at 230 Vac. Those are motors for machine tools and I couldn't hear any difference with those motors as well. :)
Hello,

I am based in Australia and the main voltage varies between 220v and 250v. Official main voltage ie 230v. :)
 

PRR

Member
Paid Member
2003-06-12 7:04 pm
Maine USA
www.diyaudio.com
The voltage is not critical within +/-20%. We are not sawing knotty oak.

This type motor goes by frequency. You need the right pulley and you say you have a 50.

The cap is moderately critical, and those instructions tell exactly what you need.

The 4-lead motor can be connected parallel for 110V or series for 220V. Basic electricity.

Your colors are different from the instructions. Did the motor vendor give you a clue? An ohm-meter will tell you which pair is a winding. I "suspect" that a 3-watt motor this large can stand 1 or 2 seconds of wrong-connection: if it doesn't spin right away, shut down and figure some more.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

decommo

Member
2019-09-02 11:59 pm
The voltage is not critical within +/-20%. We are not sawing knotty oak.

This type motor goes by frequency. You need the right pulley and you say you have a 50.

The cap is moderately critical, and those instructions tell exactly what you need.

The 4-lead motor can be connected parallel for 110V or series for 220V. Basic electricity.

Your colors are different from the instructions. Did the motor vendor give you a clue? An ohm-meter will tell you which pair is a winding. I "suspect" that a 3-watt motor this large can stand 1 or 2 seconds of wrong-connection: if it doesn't spin right away, shut down and figure some more.

Thank you. I got the instruction that came with motor.

To use in 220v, are Hurst motor 2 blue wires as "white", black wire as "Green" and Red as "Red" indicated on above diagram?
 

Attachments

  • IMG_1794.jpg
    IMG_1794.jpg
    816.3 KB · Views: 32

decommo

Member
2019-09-02 11:59 pm
I put remarks on the wiring diagram and listed the change below. Have I understood correctly for 220v operation?

  • 0.1MFD cap to change to 0.39MFD
  • Put Red & Blue wire from motor together (in series) and connect them on one end of 0.39mfd cap
  • Connect the other blue wire from motor and one of AC main wire from switch (Yellow) on the other end of 0.39 mfd cap
  • Connect Black wire from motor to the other AC main wire

Thank you...
 

Attachments

  • AR XB Motor Rewiring.png
    AR XB Motor Rewiring.png
    63.3 KB · Views: 26

decommo

Member
2019-09-02 11:59 pm
I am now very confused. I asked a friend who is more familiar with electronics and he told me that 115V Hurst Motor (3001-001) cannot be used in 220v AC environment because it is induction motor and need to get the correct voltage 230v motor. Is this correct? o_O
 

PRR

Member
Paid Member
2003-06-12 7:04 pm
Maine USA
www.diyaudio.com
I am confused too. The Hurst sheet covers many models and I hesitate to interpret it. Is Hurst still in business? Ask them?

There is always the dual-primary 115+115V transformer rigged as an autotransformer to step-down. 30VA should be plenty. There's no user-touch parts in the turntable line-wiring so isolation is not needed.
 

decommo

Member
2019-09-02 11:59 pm
I am confused too. The Hurst sheet covers many models and I hesitate to interpret it. Is Hurst still in business? Ask them?

There is always the dual-primary 115+115V transformer rigged as an autotransformer to step-down. 30VA should be plenty. There's no user-touch parts in the turntable line-wiring so isolation is not needed.

Yes, I think that they are big company and still going strong. Here is their website About Us page.
https://www.hurst-motors.com/aboutus.html

I sent an email to them but given the size & nature of business (B2B business) not sure if they will reply individual customer.

I am thinking to use Ariston RD80 turntable approach which uses 10K ohm resistor to reduce the voltage down.
Ordered 10K, 12K and 15K resistors to test with (will arrive in 2~3 weeks) and hopefully it works.
 

Attachments

  • RD80 Wiring Diagram.png
    RD80 Wiring Diagram.png
    181.1 KB · Views: 33