Anyone familiar with Weller WTPC-S with TCP-S?

Hello,

I'm an absolute beginner from Italy and I'm building an Elekit TU-8100 single ended triode kit. I was halfway through the soldering joints and the soldering station I had bought failed. I sent it back and I'm waiting for a refund.

My income is low and second hand weller soldering stations cost a fortune over in Europe. Three times as much as in North America, or even more. The only one that I could afford is the wtcp-s with tcp-s soldering iron.

Anyone familiar with this product? Do you think is adapted to the build I'm doing?

I'm using 63/37 rosin core solder, 0.6 mm.

I'm a little bit worried about the tips temperatures. There are 700 degree fahrenheit tips, about 370 Celsius. Is this the actual temperature you are going to have on the tip? Isn't 370 Celsius a bit high for PCB boards? Lower than this there are 600 fahrenheit tips, about 310 Celsius, which seems a bit low. Besides, for these it is not available the classic conical shape.

Would you recommend this Weller WTCP-S for this build? Could you recommend one or two specific PT series tip models for the build of this tube amp? Could you tell me what's the actual temperature you are going to have for a 700 fahrenheit PT series tip?

If you think it could work out, could you give me any suggestion and tip on the use of this weller?

Thanks in advance,

Regards,
 
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I have an old WTCP-S that I still occasionally use. I think I bought it over 30 years ago and it still works fine. I can also still buy new tips, which is often difficult for some of the cheaper stuff.

I moved to a new Weller about 10 years ago. No because the WTCP-S was not good, but because I wanted proper vacuum suctioning, so I replaced it with a WR-2. Being able to vary the temperature without changing tips is handy, but not essential.

I still use the WTCP-S sometimes, mainly when I need a different tip than is in my main (hot) one.

All my WTCP-S tips are for 700F, and I have found them to be fine to work with. Note that I do not use lead-free solder, which often requires higher temperatures. I think I used the PT-A and PT-H tips most.
Note I have my WR-2 usually at 380C, so about the same as the WTCP-S.

I don't know the Elekit you will be building, but I don't think you will have any trouble with the WTCP-S. I have used it for years to solder computer cables (mainly DB25 and DB9) as well as pcb soldering.
When I still did a lot of cable soldering, I used multicore 60/40. I still have two 500g rolls that I bought many years ago. I think I used 0.7 and 0.8mm depending on the job.
For audio I mainly use WBT solder nowadays, which has some silver in it as well. It is nice to work with but expensive. It is supposed to sound better (which justifies the price) but I never did a proper comparison. I could afford it, so bought a roll. Without wanting to start an argument about solder quality (some people have very strong opinions on the subject) I would not worry about it. As to diameter, it is easier to work with solder that is a bit thinner than required, than solder that is too thick for the job.

Good luck on your build!
 
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I would consider the Weller a good investment. I have been using one of those irons as my primary soldering iron for over 25 years, with just a collection of different tips for different usage scenarios. It's always worked flawlessly and as @albertNL commented you can still get spare tips (which you can't if you buy a "supermarket special" solder station).

As for the temperature, be advised that the temp. code is where the heating cuts out, and not the temperature of the tip. Depending on what you are soldering and how wide the tip is, the material will absorb more or less heat which affects the temperature that you get on the actual tip of the iron. I would stick to the standard code 7 tips except if you buy a very thin tip for SMD work in which case you may need to move up to the 8 type.
 
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Weller TCP-S is what I use for over 40 years.
The standard tips that come with the iron are the #7 IIRC.
The numbers indicates the temperature.
I have 3 tips, a fine, middle and a tick one.

The iron and the tips wear down over the years but the soldering station still works flawless.
A big advantige of these irons is the very flexible cable that connects the iron with the station.

Hugo
 
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Thanks folks,

I'm going to need a classic round conical shape tip for regular joints, resistors, capacitors, diode, ect. I have seen there's a P7P7 available, round conical. Or do you suggest a small screwdriver tip for the regular joints?

For two FETs I still have to mount I will probably need a larger scredriwer tip. PTH7 or PTA7?

Thanks again,
 
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The soldering station comes with a sponge that should be kept wet to clean your tip.
Just in case you'd wonder how to use it :)

Hugo

Sponge.jpg
 
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I'm going to need a classic round conical shape tip for regular joints, resistors, capacitors, diode, ect. I have seen there's a P7P7 available, round conical. Or do you suggest a small screwdriver tip for the regular joints?
For two FETs I still have to mount I will probably need a larger scredriwer tip. PTH7 or PTA7?

I have always used the smallest chisel tip for most work, and it works great.
https://www.techni-tool.com/product/272TI1026-PTA7

Strongly recommend against using the conical tip at all, because it has poor heat capacity,
especially the longer ones. You will be wasting your money on a conical tip.
 
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Thanks again.

I found a WTCP-S in Milan. I will probably place the order tomorrow.

I'm using 63/37 rosin core and I have been putting a tiny bit of extra flux paste before soldering. Is it safer for a beginner to add a bit of extra flux before? I'm asking because the paste is difficult to clean up with isopropyl alcohol. Is liquid flux better for electronics?

Have a nice day (or night) anyone.
 
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I am using these Wellers for decades. They are not bad, but over-prized. If you buy a used one for about 50E there is a good chance that the temperature switch is burned - a spare part is available for about 50E. And the complete soldering iron is about 130Euro new with guarantee. So I have two of these for the coarse work, but I would like to know a recommandation for something less expensive affordable for repair groups in schools. The problem with these al cheapos are ultra-low quality tips that makes them un-usable.
 
A few years ago, my Weller TCP failed. While waiting for a replacement heating element, I bought a T12 from AliExpress. This one becomes my daily driver for over 5 years, even after the Weller is repaired; it's so much more convenient, for about $40 shipped. The only downside is the useless default tip, so buy the kit with a few more tips and a stand.

1698136745193.png
 
I'm using 63/37 rosin core and I have been putting a tiny bit of extra flux paste before soldering. Is it safer for a beginner to add a bit of extra flux before? I'm asking because the paste is difficult to clean up with isopropyl alcohol. Is liquid flux better for electronics?
The only time I have used flux is when soldering smd parts. Normally the flux in the solder is all that is needed.
Plenty of isopropyl alcohol and a nice soft childrens toothbrush should be enough to clean the pcbs. You won't get rid of all the flux in one go, and will need to rinse the toothbrush often to avoid spreading the dissolved flux everywhere.
 
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A few years ago, my Weller TCP failed. While waiting for a replacement heating element, I bought a T12 from AliExpress. This one becomes my daily driver for over 5 years, even after the Weller is repaired; it's so much more convenient, for about $40 shipped. The only downside is the useless default tip, so buy the kit with a few more tips and a stand.

View attachment 1226930
This is interesting. Could you pls give a link to spare tips?
 
My Weller WTCP is getting close to being 50 years old and is my daily driver. I use the PTA7 tip for most work.

Almost impossible to use the WTCP for soldering the most simple of SMT devices because the tips are magnetic unless the device is held down by a third hand to overcome the attraction.

Wet your sponge with distilled water and your tips will last longer.
 
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