Advice on making a flexible test enclosure

mtidge

Member
2018-12-12 12:22 pm
I'm trying to come up with a design for an reconfigurable enclosure for in box driver measurements. I'm thinking of a modular baffle that will allow me to test different driver sizes, positions and configurations. For the box maybe build a frame using 1 1/2 x 1 1/2 strips of different lengths pegged together. I would then just use a few layers of cardboard taped to the frame. Up till now I have been designing and building a complete enclosure, installed my drivers and testing, if I didn't like the results I'm left with a pile of scrap. What does every one else do?
 

mtidge

Member
2018-12-12 12:22 pm
Look of views, no replies. I went ahead with my 1st try, because I'm building a trapezoidal enclosure I just made a complete baffle. Instead of 1 /2 x 1 1/2 I went with 1 1/4 x 3/4 birch plywood. I screwed it together and taped double ply cardboard, doubled again on the long panels to stiffen it. It worked fine, I have a test box in about 3 to 4 hours. I'm listening now and I'm amazed how good it sounds, maybe I should just stick to cardboard, cheaper and faster. Anyhow, it is a three way, but I don't have the mid yet so I just crossed it at 3k and bumped the woofer 5 db and I'm on my way.
 

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ScottG

Member
2003-02-04 12:23 am
US
Nice, fairly low in waste (the baffle itself) as far as reuse goes for multiple projects.

The baffle cut itself was probably pretty easy, but the router setup for the drivers can take a bit more time (even with a good "jig").

You can also use different quart-round for the edges to see different diffraction effects, but remember to have the entire box card-boarded up otherwise diffraction and cancellation effects will give different results.

At some point you can just go with frames (including for the *drivers) and then fill-in with cardboard (along with some panel-damping for that cardboard).

*you can do a few "universal" driver frames/mounts that are basically "rings" just larger than than the particular driver size with multiple regular screw-holes and 4 extensions from the ring for mounting to the frame. For durability: use "tight/many layer" furniture-grade plywood for those driver mounts. Make sure you chamfer the rear.
 
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