A simple tiny PCb for those little alpha pots

I designed this little PCB for those killer alpha pots you can get from Jaycar.

I have not tried it yet.

Mostly I wanted the board to avoid having to solder wire directly to the tiny pot, but also because I wanted a place for a resistor on input since for even some of my unity gain headphone amps some of my soures are too hot.

Cheers!
Russ
 

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What about tightening up the layout a bit and adding mounting holes?

And we should start updating the wiki more, it seems a little out of date.

Is there a diyaudio ftp somewhere for linking to stuff on the wiki? or should we link to the forums? I would use my host, but in 5 years you'll just see 404 not found errors.
 
asgorath said:
What about tightening up the layout a bit and adding mounting holes?

And we should start updating the wiki more, it seems a little out of date.

Is there a diyaudio ftp somewhere for linking to stuff on the wiki? or should we link to the forums? I would use my host, but in 5 years you'll just see 404 not found errors.


Mounting holes?

Seriously? Hadn't considered it. The PCB is just an extension of the pot. And its tiny.
 
I was thinking of mounting the pot at the back of the amp and using a long rod to connect it to the knob. That way my inputs are nice and short and far away from the transformer. Mounting holes would make this a lot easier. Though, I could always just add extra board space for the mounting holes without it actually being part of the copper.
 
BrianDonegan said:
I was thinking of mounting the pot at the back of the amp and using a long rod to connect it to the knob. That way my inputs are nice and short and far away from the transformer. Mounting holes would make this a lot easier. Though, I could always just add extra board space for the mounting holes without it actually being part of the copper.


Ahhh good thinking, well I hadn't planned on using like that, but I will create a second board with mounting holes. :)
 
I do. The circuit is so simple. Using it to switch a power relay is super simple. De-bouncing isn;t a problem, and the toggle state is build in. I have a working test circuit for this. It consists of one chip ($.98each), a 10nF cap, a pull-down resistor and a relay.

Now, what I need is the logic circuitry for source switching. My last Digital Logic class was in 1989 or there abouts, so I am a little rusty. I plan on using the chips in pulse mode (emits a logic low pulse), one chip per source, but need the logic to turn on the source replay and release the other relays. I keep meaning to sit down and thinkit through but can't find the time. If anyone wants to pitch in, I will design and etch boards for it and get the whole thing tested. I bought 5 of the 110 chips with my last digikey order.