4 ohms vs 8 ohms

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ocool_15

Member
2004-11-26 3:15 am
sk
your amp wont like it. perhaps run a 4ohm non inductive power resistor in series with load for 2 channels.

I would think you should be able to run 2 channels in parrallel with a .1ohm resistor in series before they connect together allowing you to use the full amp. I think that will work but am not positive. I assume the amp has a common ground for the - terminals.
 
Hi,
I agree the amp will not like it.
Your info indicates that the Bose are 4ohm speakers and using A + B will give you 2 ohms when in parallel. However your amp my have a switch that offers A alone or B alone or A + B in series. If you can confirm this last option then the amp will be safe since you will be loading it with 8ohms which you said was it's rating. But speakers in series do not sound nice.
 
Use a different amp, or run another 4 ohm speaker in series with your speaker.

IMO most amps should be made for 4 ohms, but most home amps are 8 ohms min :(

What I do for my setup: (My receiver is 100W/ch @ 8ohm)

My speakers are 2 boxed car speakers with two 8" woofers + tweeters, 4 ohm in each speaker.

I wire the two 4 ohm speakers in each box in series and in phase so I get an effective 8 ohm speaker for each channel.

That's the best way to do it without having to waste power in a resistor, or overload the amp. Just connect speakers in series.
 

anatech

Administrator
Paid Member
2004-06-06 8:31 pm
Georgetown, On
Your 405 runs the A and B sets in parallel when they are both selected. You can run one set of speakers only. Two and the Lux will spite you by expiring. Nice sounding receiver but it has been prone to poor solder connections and a factory error with some units where the bias was set too darn high. A little TLC may be in order.

-Chris
 
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