3D printed audio stuff (with STL files)

pelanj

Member
Paid Member
2008-07-17 8:47 am
Hořovice
I got into 3D printing and I think I have started already too many threads here, so I am starting this one to share my 3D printed audio stuff.

The first one is a back cover for BC 8PE21. I printed it with only 11% infill to use some leftover filament, for strength I think it would need more. Also, the strength could be improved by adding ribs - especially on the flat part, the sides seem OK. Its intended use is for using the 8PE21 with a RCF H6000 horn or with the 135 Hz midbass horn by John Inlow. It fits the driver fine. For me, making one from wood would be a nightmare. 3D printing is easy:)

Edit: Here is the index of the posted models from page 2 on:
Post #17: Mount piece for Visaton FRS8M (by arcgotic) 3D printed audio stuff (with STL files)
Post #25: 20 cm paraline (not the best design, for experimenters only) 3D printed audio stuff (with STL files)
Post #61 Screw in driver to 3" diameter two screw bolt on (may not work for all drivers) 3D printed audio stuff (with STL files)
Post #65 8PE21 front aperture 3D printed audio stuff (with STL files)
Post #101 34c9 base 3D printed audio stuff (with STL files)

Some more K-tubes: https://www.diyaudio.com/community/threads/3d-printed-audio-stuff-with-stl-files.349459/post-6890665
 

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  • BC 8PE21 Back Cover v3.zip
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Last edited:

pelanj

Member
Paid Member
2008-07-17 8:47 am
Hořovice

Attachments

  • KTubes.zip
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pelanj

Member
Paid Member
2008-07-17 8:47 am
Hořovice
And the last one for today, a 5 mm thick distance ring for mounting the 8PE21 on the H6000 horn. The H6000 are now being drilled and tapped for driver mounting, the ring fits the front gasket really well.
 

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  • 8PE21Ring.jpg
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  • 8PE21DistanceRing v1.zip
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I got into 3D printing and I think I have started already too many threads here, so I am starting this one to share my 3D printed audio stuff.

The first one is a back cover for BC 8PE21. I printed it with only 11% infill to use some leftover filament, for strength I think it would need more. Also, the strength could be improved by adding ribs - especially on the flat part, the sides seem OK. Its intended use is for using the 8PE21 with a RCF H6000 horn or with the 135 Hz midbass horn by John Inlow. It fits the driver fine. For me, making one from wood would be a nightmare. 3D printing is easy:)

Did you know that exposed porous infill can be used as self damping material? Basically printed reticulated “foam”. You can make a rough surface with pointed cones as an absorber under the foam.
 

pelanj

Member
Paid Member
2008-07-17 8:47 am
Hořovice
The mini-Klam did not measure too well but maybe it was just me and my not too perfect measurement techniques - and I most probably also measured in the wrong plane - I need to revisit that one day, since DonVK's sims of the K-tube were eye opening. Also, since it is easy to 3D print anything, I would make it round next time. I do jot think that the prismatic shape could bring any gain acoustically.

I would highly recommend the dual slot one - the dispersion was symmetrical and it measured quite well. And you showed me some posts here that a member here is actually using dual slot K-tubes - and I can understand why - but I yet have to print the second one...

I wonder if there could be any gain to have a Paraline-like device with a K-slot or if the K-Tube could be folded flat in a similar way. Or it it was even possible or made any sense at all.
 

pelanj

Member
Paid Member
2008-07-17 8:47 am
Hořovice
As a teaser, these are the parts that will be printed during the next few days. It will be a bit of a challenge because I got some warping on my prints lately and these are amost across the whole bed. I think my nozzle moved a slight bit higher during a power loss incident and therefore my settings that worked before do not work that good anymore. I was able to solve that with brim-like supports included into the models, but I would like to print as it is now to test how the autolevel function actually works and if it even works in my version of firmware.

Also, some, if not all chamfers are not technically correct for the paraline, I just made them by feeling and what my 3D skills permitted. If the prints turn out nice and flat, I will apply Revell plasto to the inner surfaces, with a bit of sanding and a layer of spray paint, I can get almost mirror quality finish.

If the prints will be warped despite all precautions, I will just try to screw them together and heat up by a heat gun to try to iron them out. That is going to be fun:)
 

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  • ParalineRender.jpg
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Warping on large prints has to do with the temperature vs lay down speed profiles. I had this once and did some research online. What helped was slowing down the speed of filament deposit to allow more time to cool slowly so stress is relieved. Not using a cooling fan to blow on the molten deposited filament helped a lot. Keeping bed heater warmer helped too. It takes a lot of trial and error. That’s the worse thing about 3D prints. It’s a time waster if you change something like filament brand or print size or print speed.