12,000W Amp with DSP for $599?

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EDIT:

The DSP version is $999:


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Yep 12,000 Watts... Behringer announced the iNuke12000DSP! I own the iNuke3000DSP and its very reliable, the DSP is veryyyy helpful with the crossovers, and power limiting. I can't believe Behringer is doing a 12,000 watt amp with two 6000w 2 Ohm channels, and weighs less than 18 pounds! I can't find any gossip of a price, but if it follows the tend it should be sold for $599??

I've seen cheaper prices for these amps, but these are the popular prices:

iNuke1000DSP - $299
iNuke3000DSP - $399
iNuke6000DSP - $499
iNuke12000DSP - $599?

Has anyone else heard anything about this amp?

A message from Behringer on this issue:

Dear All,

Thanks for your interest in the iNuke amplifier series. I have to apologize for a typo on the marketing feature list of NU12000DSP.
NU12000 technically is based around 4 amplifier modules, two pairs of which are internally working in a bridge mode configuration, already.
Hence, there is no further option for bridging channels and the minimal load impedance is 4 Ohms, each. We will immediately fix the web featurelist to correctly state:
2 x 6000 Watts into 4 Ohms, 2 x 3,000 Watts into 8 Ohms

Sorry for the inconvenience, and I hope that makes sense to you.

Regards,

Jan Duwe
Assistant Manager Conceptual Engineering
MUSIC-GROUP Services EU

Going by the NU6000 specs (which have been confirmed on test) this will mean 2x4400Wrms into 4 ohms and 2x2200Wrms into 8 ohms.

Behringer now shows the iNuke12000 (non-DSP) version on the product list, and added both the 12000DSP and non DSP to the brochure.

Like the other Non-DSP models, This has a crossover switch fixed at 100 Hz on the back, which can be very helpful still. (seen in the Picture below)

Other than that, we find out the real weight of it:

"NU12000DSP
Ultra-Lightweight, High-Density
12000-Watt Power Amplifier with
DSP Control and USB Interface
Delivers 2 x 6000 Watts into 4 Ohms,
2 x 3000 Watts into 8 Ohms and
weighs less than 18 lbs / 8.2 kg"

The part where it says "2 x 6000 Watts into 4 Ohms, and 2 x 3000 Watts into 8 Ohms" conflicts with the power ratings on the back of the unit [in the 3D render] Seen below:


[IMGDEAD]http://www.behringer.com/assets/NU12000_P0AMS_Rear_XXL.png[/IMGDEAD]

Here's a link to the brochure:
http://www.behringer.com/assets/NU1000_NU3000_NU6000_NU12000_NU1000DSP_NU3000DSP_NU6000DSP_NU12000DSP_WebBrochure.pdf

iNuke12000:
Behringer: iNUKE NU12000

iNuke12000DSP:
Behringer: iNUKE NU12000DSP

Uli Behringer of The Music Group Q&A - Page 21

Uli says "Upon request from professional touring sound companies, we just launched a very powerful 12,000 Watt version which basically contains two NU6000 amps in a 2U case."

Aha - so it's two NU6000 amps, must be some mods to get to be stable at 2 ohms per side.

"... we are currently testing some low-noise fans and are positive to be able to improve this aspect."

Later, he makes a note of the nu4-6000
"We are currently studying the market demand for a 4-channel DSP version in order to evaluate if such a model would justify the R&D investment. It would be great to get some feedback here."

Looks like new things are coming.


someone posted a picture from somewhere with the map price @ 899 without dsp 999 with.

From the Behringer NU6000 Spec sheet
RMS:
1100w @ 8ohm per channel, stereo
2200w @ 4ohm per channel, stereo

And that matches measurements on the other forum.
So really, this is very likely the same amp,
4400w @ 2ohm
Beefed up power supply and cooling and rated down to 2 ohms per channel.

The iNuke 6000 does not do 6000W (although the power is unheard of at THAT price level):
Behringer inuke NU6000 vs KAM KXD7200 bench tested - Speakerplans.com Forums - Page 1

So I would not expect the iNuke12000 to do 12000W.

Besides: With the iNuke6k, they saved money by omitting the PFC circuit, which can - but need not - be a problem to the ac supply. Better to have a PFC to prevent any 80A current peaks and the like.

The iNuke12000 dosen't use an IEC, but a PowerCON.

That is a PowerCon @ 32 A (240v)
 
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They have GOT to be kidding. The 6000 watt amp is fed by an IEC connector?

Assuming 100% efficiency in the power supply and output section, 6000 watts is 50 amps at 120 volts. At a more reasonable 83% wall-to-speaker efficiency, that's 60 amps. As a point of reference, an IEC is specified for 10 or 15 amps -- you'd melt that little thing right off the back panel.

Then the amp has to dump 1000 watts of heat; good luck with that little fan.

I ain't convinced.
 
They have GOT to be kidding. The 6000 watt amp is fed by an IEC connector?

Assuming 100% efficiency in the power supply and output section, 6000 watts is 50 amps at 120 volts. At a more reasonable 83% wall-to-speaker efficiency, that's 60 amps. As a point of reference, an IEC is specified for 10 or 15 amps -- you'd melt that little thing right off the back panel.

Then the amp has to dump 1000 watts of heat; good luck with that little fan.

I ain't convinced.

or a 220v 30 amp

someone posted a picture from somewhere with the map price @ 899 without dsp 999 with.
 
The iNuke 6000 does not do 6000W (although the power is unheard of at THAT price level):
http://forum.speakerplans.com/behringer ... 69202.html

So I would not expect the iNuke12000 to do 12000W.

Besides: With the iNuke6k, they saved money by omitting the PFC circuit, which can - but need not - be a problem to the ac supply. Better to have a PFC to prevent any 80A current peaks and the like.
 
They have GOT to be kidding. The 6000 watt amp is fed by an IEC connector?

Assuming 100% efficiency in the power supply and output section, 6000 watts is 50 amps at 120 volts. At a more reasonable 83% wall-to-speaker efficiency, that's 60 amps. As a point of reference, an IEC is specified for 10 or 15 amps -- you'd melt that little thing right off the back panel.

Then the amp has to dump 1000 watts of heat; good luck with that little fan.

I ain't convinced.

The iNuke12000 dosen't use an IEC, but a PowerCON. As far as fans go two fans according to the pictures:

[IMGDEAD]http://www.behringer.com/assets/NU12000DSP_P0AMT_Rear_XXL.png[/IMGDEAD]

For the thermal buildup, the iNukes are very good with low heat, I had my iNuke3000DSP running a 4 ohm channel at max power to a dual 18 (aprox 600w RMS) and a 2 ohm channel to 2x dual 10" Folded Horns (aprox 900w RMS) and I felt no heat on the amp.

The iNuke6000:
"USA / Canada 120V~, 60Hz (25A)
UK / Australia / Europe 220-240 V~, 50/60 Hz, (12A)
Korea / China 220-240 V~, 50/60 Hz,(12A)
Japan 100 V~, 50/60 Hz, (25A)"
 
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IRSound

Member
2012-02-03 10:47 am
it's not PowerCon i think..but it's like Crown 4X3500 mains connector.
anyway , that power rating is really a joke !! but it's not unusual from Behringer ! :rolleyes:

in my opinion , world's best high power amps in all ways are CROWN Products. for example DriveCore is state-of-art switching amplifier technology which makes amps more compact and reliable , also improve their sound quality specs. other manufactures just say thousands of watts !!!

Regards,
IRSound
 

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"In my opinion , world's best high power amps in all ways are CROWN Products. for example DriveCore is state-of-art switching amplifier technology which makes amps more compact and reliable , also improve their sound quality specs. other manufactures just say thousands of watts !!!"

no discussion - Crown Class I (BCA) products are great (I ve got a XTI6002).
But do you think, for example, LAB PLM20000Q (2 x 8000W bridged into 8 Ohms, class TD) is a toy for kids? ;-)
BTW, this thread is 'bout the new iNuke.
 
Next weekend I will measure the output of the 3000. I'm expecting 500 to 600w rms at 4ohm, 1000 to 1200w at 2ohm, and 250 to 300w at 8ohm. For the 12000 model I'd say 5kw per chan at 2ohm so 1000-1500w rms at 8ohm.

I'd agree that Crown amps are better but for 399 I got my 3000DSP with a 50' SpeakON to SpeakON, 25' SpeakON to 1/4, 10' SpeakON to 1/4 and, 25' 1/4 to 1/4. So for the price iNuke are good.
 
From the Behringer NU6000 Spec sheet
RMS:
1100w @ 8ohm per channel, stereo
2200w @ 4ohm per channel, stereo

And that matches measurements on the other forum.
So really, this is very likely the same amp,
4400w @ 2ohm
Beefed up power supply and cooling and rated down to 2 ohms per channel.

That is a PowerCon @ 32 A (240v)

But that's not a "picture" it's a computer generated image.
I don't think they have any built - yet
 
Did they ever ship any NU4-6000? I might have bought one of them. Instead I have been quite happy with (2) NU3000 for nearly a year...fanless.

MCM has the NU4-6000 listed for $549.99 it says back ordered for 14 days, but I've been keeping an eye on it. It was supposed to be in stock yesterday (2/8/2013) according to the site a month ago, but they keep pushing it back. For $549 it is a better deal than 2x 3000's and takes less space. Although, personally, I rather have the 2 amps separate (being that the NU4-6000 is really just 2 NU-3000's in one) so I could use them in two different locations if needed. It would be really nice to see a NU-6000DSP. Now that I would buy if it's for $649!

Heres a link to MCM's NU4-6000
Behringer Rack Mount Digital Amplifier - iNuke Series - 1100W RMS x 4CH | NU4-6000 (NU46000) | Behringer

So really, this is very likely the same amp,
4400w @ 2ohm
Beefed up power supply and cooling and rated down to 2 ohms per channel.

That is a very good point, raintalk! I did not look at it in that way. That seems very doable without costing $1340124. Its the same thing car amps do, they putout '5000w' (really like 2000..) but its at 1 Ohm, or even 0.5 Ohms. So that '5000w' amp is really just a 250w RMS 8 Ohm amp, with the entire unit as a heat sink
 
I haven't physically seen the NU4-6000, but then again, the DSP does look very interesting. It may only come with dual channel amps.

Hi Soldermizer - What do you mean "fanless"? Have you done some modifications to your amps?
thanks!

A common 'mod' to the iNuke line is to remove or change the fan, because it's rather loud. I personally don't mind the noise, it lets me know the amp is doing work.. because all the subs blaring isn't enough to tell. (joking of course)

As for the DSP, it's unbelievable! I use it every time I use the amp. I'm always changing my setup, adding speakers, taking away speakers, wiring them differently, changing the crossover points, any little change you can do. The fact you can hook it up to a computer makes it that much better. The interface is very user friendly and informative. My favorite part is the peak limiter, and how it tells you how many watts will go out. (sure you could find this out without the DSP but it's nice to have it right there) No, actually my favorite part(s) are the crossovers. The extra $100 I spent on the DSP version, saved me well over $500 in crossovers I would have needed for all those speakers. Yes, the non-DSP version has a 2-Way 100Hz Cross over, but that is either on, or off. For a setup that will not be changed I would go with the non-DSP version and design the speakers so that a crossover at 100Hz would work well. For Mid-Highs I still use crossovers, because there is no need for those to take both channels. If you were to be in a situation were you're using enough Mid and Highs where you would need a separate amp just to power those, lets say 16 of each, the DSP will save you $220. (assuming $20 a crossover) The EQ flexibility is really helpful too. I don't use it that much but the times I did I was grateful it was there. The dynamic EQ is there too, not sure what I'd use that for, or why, but it doesn't hurt.

Clearly I'm a little bit of a fan for the iNuke, It's not costly. You get 4 Units in one (Amp, EQ, Crossovers, and Dynamic EQ) I will admit the power rating is a little overrated, but we're talking 1100w RMS vs. 1250w RMS it says to be. What is that, a 0.5 dB difference? oh no! The DSP makes up for that. I'm still yet to test my iNuke for its power rating, maybe I'll finally do that today.
 
As abcdmku notes above, yes it is very easy to remove the fan. You can find old threads about it here, or I can send you links of other web sites (I think I put them into an old message here also.) Of course, operating without any fan at all (as I do) will "de-rate" or reduce the heat dissipation and therefore the watts your amp will push. Still, my amp rarely shuts down, putting ? watts into (4) Bose 901 II (4 ohm hook-up). Only will "thermal" (protect) on continuous very bass-heavy and LOUD music. A bonus: does not sound like a hair dryer when no music is playing :) In many months of using one or the other amps, I have had NO DAMAGE AT ALL unless you count some ill-advised removal of inductors and capacitors one unit. I managed to solder things back in and the amp works -- amazingly! Also note the fan removal is easily reversible (unless you melt the amplifier, of course.) :darkside:

Observations: (2) NU3000 is very close in cost to the NU4-6000. Also, I am sure the DSP is wonderful, however the DSP looks to cost about $50 per channel. A miniDSP will give you 4 channels of control for about $35/channel.
 
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The comment on the other site linked, where extensive tests were done shows a few concerning points.

The heat.
The possible non-linearity of SMD caps causing excess distortion - especially with heat.
The oddly done feedback, before the output network.
The relatively low DF
The heat. Did I mention that?
And one fellow said they would absolutely not work into 2 ohms? Anyone really try to pump any power at 2 ohms?

The DSP is cool.

I was considering this to run some subs, power + cheap + DSP.
Not so sure now...

_-_-
 
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