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Old 24th December 2012, 09:31 PM   #1081
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eheh amarone
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Old 24th December 2012, 10:20 PM   #1082
giulio is offline giulio  United Kingdom
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Got mine just in time to put it under the tree!

Many thanks, Domenico, and best wishes of a happy Christmas
Giulio
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Old 26th December 2012, 06:46 AM   #1083
amanero is offline amanero  Italy
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Happy Holidays!
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Old 26th December 2012, 10:58 AM   #1084
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glt View Post
Hmmm, I got to try this. With another interface and Buffalo II 80 MHz, bypassing OSF did not solve the noise problem:
If I turned OSF off, I got the following:

SR<352Khz resulted in fast intermittent sound with the lock-led flashing like crazy. By increasing the dpll bandwidth setting to highest and the dpll bandwidth multiplier to x128 (this is the highest bandwidth setting possible), the lock-led flashing rate slightly decreased as though the DPLL was trying to lock. But there was no lock and no music
For sample rates 352.8K and below, the DPLL was able to lock but only when there was no music content (for example when the player is paused).
SR=384Khz resulted in “normal sound”
The frequency of the DPLL indicated was 64x smaller what it should be for I2S input. So for example, for SR=384Khz, the sample frequency determined by the dpll was 6000 Hz (if you multiply 6000×64 you get 384000 Hz)
I expect you may have been "fooled" by the HiFiDuino code...

I (some years back now) tested the HiFiDuino code, but after some testing i decided I could not use it due to the code was not conditional, the display routines displayed what the code was "believing" what the registers was programmed with and not the real register contents, and the display routines could not display volume levels in 0.5dB steps..
Also it did not use EEPROM for recall / storage of settings, did not control display contrast / backlight, did not control battery charging, did not have a register dump routine to the display for debugging, did not have good enough IRQ / realtime functions, did not display battery / PSU voltages or remaining battery time etc. etc..

It was impossible to know what values the ES9018 registers really was programmed with due to many registers have bits with very different functions and the HiFiDueno code programmed the very same registers from different places in the code without having a system taking care of the individual functions / bits.

The HiFiDueno code may have been rewritten so the basic inconveniences I experienced may have been rectified..
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Old 26th December 2012, 11:18 AM   #1085
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Originally Posted by amanero View Post
Happy Holidays!
For you too.

What about the ASIO drivers?
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Old 26th December 2012, 06:10 PM   #1086
farhun is offline farhun  United States
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Originally Posted by amanero View Post
Happy Holidays!
Amanero,
I've received mine too. Thanks very much and Happy Holidays!
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Old 27th December 2012, 11:14 AM   #1087
alexbv2 is offline alexbv2  Ukraine
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I received boards today. Thanks very much Domenico and Happy Holidays all!
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Old 27th December 2012, 07:32 PM   #1088
ronpod is offline ronpod  United States
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Join Date: Mar 2010
Amanero,

The board arrived today! Christmas did not slow down the delivery.

The 7474 G Series flip-flops from Potato Semi Corp also arrived.
Now I'm ready to have fun!

Thanks Domenico! and Happy Holidays.

RonP
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Old 29th December 2012, 01:31 AM   #1089
glt is offline glt  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayCtech View Post
I expect you may have been "fooled" by the HiFiDuino code...

... the display routines displayed what the code was "believing" what the registers was programmed with and not the real register contents, ..
If you cannot believe what values are written to the registers, how can you believe what you read from them? :-)

Happy New Year!
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Old 29th December 2012, 09:35 AM   #1090
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayCtech
I expect you may have been "fooled" by the HiFiDuino code...

... the display routines displayed what the code was "believing" what the registers was programmed with and not the real register contents, ..
Quote:
Originally Posted by glt View Post
If you cannot believe what values are written to the registers, how can you believe what you read from them? :-)

Happy New Year!
Therein lies the "problem"....

You can count on your memories and your ability to have the logic of all code in your head...
Or make the code conditional...

As an example there are registers with multiple functions:

Code:
if (REG14CH==1)
    {
    REG14 = DACmap + TrueMode + IIR + Slope ;
    I2C_TX(S32A, 14, REG14);   // DAC3-4-7-8 Source, IIR Bandwidth, FIR Rolloff, Pseudo/True mode
    REG14CH=0;
    }
If I remember correctly the HiFiDuino code will when one of the functions are changed write to the register and thus also change ALL functions controlled by the register....
And if I also remember correctly - this will be done from several completely different locations and functions of the code....
And also the writes to the display are done in the same fashion.
Thus the programming and the displayed info may or may not be correct and it depends completely on if the programmer and code have incorporated enough "logic" to have total control of 2 million possible register setting combinations.

The conditional approach (as an example) allows for the IIR Bandwidth to be changed to a new value from the IR remote routine. Then only the variable for the IIR Bandwidth and the variable that tells that register 14 needs an update are changed in RAM.
Then the register programming routine are called and only registers witch need programming are updated.
Then the display routine are called and updates the display based on the true register settings.

With the conditional approach over 2 million possible register setting combinations can be selected in any combination - controlled from the IR remote - and the registers are programmed correctly and both the standard display info and the "register dump" display routine will show the actual and correct informations.
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