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Old 19th November 2006, 10:36 PM   #21
Sherman is offline Sherman  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by AndrewT
...
finger joints are a quick & easy way to avoid the much better dovetail joint.
...
A dovetail joint is only "better" if one needs extra strength in one direction. A dovetail can't be pulled apart across the pins and tails but will open up just as easily as finger joints on the side in line with the pins and tails.

If equal strength is required in both directions finger joints are just as strong (perhaps stronger since finger joints often have many more joints per inch than dovetails and more joints means more glue surface).


Quote:
Originally posted by Nordic
Mittred corners at 45 degrees glues well, especialy on grain ends..

a few panel nails sunk and filled with putty and bob's your uncle...
Fast, easy and to some, better looking. Many people don't care for the visible joints of a finger joint, preferring a more "furniture" look. My first wooden amp chassis were mitered with braces.

It all depends on one's aesthetics.
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Old 19th November 2006, 11:30 PM   #22
Trout is offline Trout  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by Nordic
Mittred corners at 45 degrees glues well, especialy on grain ends..

a few panel nails sunk and filled with putty and bob's your uncle...

I have on occasion used a biscuit joiner combined with Mitered corners on several cabinet jobs for McDonalds Lodge years ago. This was a rock solid combination and not especially difficult.
Works great for a no nail no screw scenario but still needs internal blocking of some type. I use mostly glue blocks.

On cabs that are going to be covered in either tweed or tolex, I often use glue and screws, But, I counter bore the screws about 3/8th below the surface. Then plug the hole with 3/8th dowel after the joint has dried. Sand it off smooth and then radius the edge. By counter boring the screws, you then have no fear of the rollover bit hitting the head of the screw.

I finish up the joint inside with simple 2X2 split at a 45 degree angle, then cut them into 2-4" long glue blocks.
Real old school but very solid.

I used the Doweling machine @ work once to build a cab, But it was a PITA just due to the extra work setting up, inserting all the dowels, and of course the glue cleanup. But, I will admit the case clamp was great for holding squareness while drying.

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Old 19th November 2006, 11:48 PM   #23
PRNDL is offline PRNDL  United States
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I ended up cutting the bad finger joints off and gluing and screwing them together into an extra piece as described above.

There was some difficulty getting the screws in tight with the extra piece aligned perfectly. This might have been easier with nails.

Do you recommend wood sealer?
(I recall seeing a project where they sealed the entire cabinet before tolex).

Next up will be tolex!
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Old 20th November 2006, 12:09 AM   #24
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Default Wood filler

Elmer's (not their glue) makes a good wood filler.
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Old 20th November 2006, 07:32 AM   #25
Casey4s is offline Casey4s  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by PRNDL
I ended up cutting the bad finger joints off and gluing and screwing them together into an extra piece as described above.

There was some difficulty getting the screws in tight with the extra piece aligned perfectly. This might have been easier with nails.

Do you recommend wood sealer?
(I recall seeing a project where they sealed the entire cabinet before tolex).

Next up will be tolex!
No you don't need to seal the wood, the glue for the Tolex will seal it from absorbing moisture. I used to do that but no longer see the need to do so.

I have built a number of Combo and speaker cabinets over the past 9 or 10 years. If you don't have the gear or are having a problem with box or dovetails, there is nothing wrong with a good tight "Butt Joint". One that is glued and screwed is very strong, and don't forget that the baffle and back panel(s) will prevent the cabinet from RACKING or twisting.

I prefer Box joints most of the time, which I cut on a HomeMade Router Jig. They are 1/2" and are indeed strong.

If you are going to apply Tolex here is a short Tutorial on the basics of Tolex application.

Tolex Tutorial Text Pages

Below are the Photos, They are in three albums near the bottom of the page. (dbl. Click on thumbnails to enlarge)

Tolex Photos ( & other project Photos)

Good luck with your project...
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Old 20th November 2006, 04:30 PM   #26
PRNDL is offline PRNDL  United States
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How long does tolex glue usually take to dry initially, before you put it on the cabinet?
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Old 20th November 2006, 08:37 PM   #27
Casey4s is offline Casey4s  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by PRNDL
How long does tolex glue usually take to dry initially, before you put it on the cabinet?

It depends on several factors, temperature, humidity, ventilation and the the amount applied, as well as the type of glue you use. But NORMALY it only takes a few minutes to "tack" to where you can appply the two surfaces together. The cement is applied to both surfaces with a contact product.

Do not use a spray on glue like the 3M product. It tacks too fast and gives you problems with positioning or repositioning the tolex as you do the covering. There are several types of contact cement available now. I started out using regular DAP in the red can which is still a good product. Now I use a water-borne product that is much easier to work with and clean up. See the text page called "New Glue Review" which is included in the Text link I posted above.
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Old 20th November 2006, 09:12 PM   #28
PRNDL is offline PRNDL  United States
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Thanks Casey!

I finished the cabinet.
It was tedious, but not too difficult, especially with the great photos to follow.

The next step will be the front and back panels.

The difficult part is the speaker hole, since I don't have a template.
I might ask for help from the local amp builder (Larry Rodgers).

Although I intended to make a smaller amp with an 10" speaker, it's almost the same size as the 12" version I'm copying.

Is the sound of the larger speaker much better?
(I like to use Emminence Redcoats).
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Old 20th November 2006, 10:08 PM   #29
Casey4s is offline Casey4s  United States
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I use a Router and homemade circle jig for the speaker holes. But before I had that rig I cut a lot of holes in baffles with a simple Jig (saber) saw and a nice plywood blade. Just use a compass (or pencil on a string) to draw the hole then cut it out slowly and carefully. Remember the hole is 1" smaller then that of the speaker size, like a 12" speaker is an 11" hole, a 10' speaker is a 9" hole.etc.

But if Larry Rodgers will cut the hole for you that might be the way to go for now. I like to do everything myself as far as I can.

The sound of the 12" over the 10" has a lot to do with the amount of air that is being moved if all else is the same or close. In some amps I actually like a smaller (10") speaker. When I built a 5E3 Fender Deluxe Variatin, for example, I used a 10" Eminence Alnico Speaker. I have used a lot of Eminence speakers, almost all of them were Alnico Magnets.
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Old 20th November 2006, 10:09 PM   #30
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After reading through all the posts since my last one and looking beyond the repeats and that we don't all use the same word to describe something, I must say it apparent that everyone who has posted, has also done of which they speak.

With all the theories and conjecture being bandied around these days, it's nice to see the meat and potatoes guys are still on track. Good on ya!

Hail to the woodworkers. The true craftspeople of DIY.
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