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Old 17th December 2002, 02:55 AM   #11
halojoy is offline halojoy  Sweden
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Default Re: caprice?

Quote:
Originally posted by fdegrove
Hi Halojoy,

Funny how you managed to misspell that.

It should say "capice?".

All things considered,you did come out of your bed again,didn't you?
Never read you a bedtime story again.

Seems to me you're the only "capricious" one around....

Altra volta,buona notte signore Groman.
as I always say when nothing is to be added
what more can I say

I like your mind though, very much are we 2 needed at this place
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Old 18th December 2002, 11:15 AM   #12
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Default DIY

Hi,

Since the Wharfedale speakers have a sensitivty of 86dB the manufacturer recommends an amplifier of 100W.

If the listening room is not big and you're not in the habit of listening at earbleeding levels I would say an amp of 50W would be more than ample.

The question now is: do you want to build from scratch, copy an existing design,build a kit?

Either way you are going to need a decent soldering iron,solder,some pliers,cutters and other tools.
A voltmeter will not be wasted either.

You decide.

Cheers,
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Frank
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Old 18th December 2002, 02:46 PM   #13
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Default DIY

fdegrove,
Thx for the reply, and the diligent research.

I seek to build a 50W tube amp, and I would prefer, in order, to either copy an existing, proven design, or build one from scratch. I am thrilled by the challenge of either of these options.

I would do a kit but I have no idea where to begin looking for such a kit here in the Chicago, Illinois area. Obviously, there is mail order or internet order, but I would love to actually talk to someone about them prior to purchase.

Pls advise. Thanks again for your help thus far.

regards,
Tony
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Old 18th December 2002, 02:59 PM   #14
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Default CHICAGO KIDS

Hi,

As far as the Chicago area goes I wouldn't know either.

If I'm not mistaken Ned Carlsson is a tube reseller with a business in your area.
I don't think he himself sells any kits but he would likely be able to advise.
Moreover he's a good source and a nice fellow as well.

NED CARLSSON

Cheers,
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Old 18th December 2002, 02:59 PM   #15
Joel is offline Joel  United States
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Tony, do you have a tube manual? There's a 50W design in the later versions (RC-23, RC-30). Might be fun to try that.
7199's can be pricey though.
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Old 18th December 2002, 05:41 PM   #16
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Default DIY

Joel:
No, I do not have a tube manual. Where might I acquire such a thing? Do these include schematics?

I do know a little about tubes though, being a fan of companies such as Audio Research, and c-j. So some of the more popular tube types I have heard of like for example the EL34, and 6550.

fdegrove:
Thx again!! I will check Ned out...


You all are great! Thanks a bunch! Please keep the ideas and commments coming...

Regards
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Old 18th December 2002, 06:01 PM   #17
Joel is offline Joel  United States
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Default Re: DIY

Quote:
Originally posted by TStrong_06
No, I do not have a tube manual. Where might I acquire such a thing? Do these include schematics?
Off of eBay, or some specialty stores online such as Antique Electronic Supply - or maybe even your local university library.
RCA's does have a handful of useful projects in the back. They include schematics, parts lists, and short descriptions. The amps are mostly push-pull pentodes with a Dynaco type driver stage.
It was just an idea.
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Old 19th December 2002, 03:29 AM   #18
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Joel:
Thanks for you help...I was just saying that I am not COMPLETELY ignorant to tubes. Maybe ignorant...not COMPLETELY ignorant.

On a scale of 1 to 10, I am likely a 2, maybe 3. But any suggestion at my level teaches me something new. I didn't even know that something such as a tube manual existed.

Thank you...Your suggestion is well taken and I will try and find one...

Any other Ideas or suggestions are very much needed and appreciated!!!

Pls keep em coming....

Regards
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Old 19th December 2002, 05:49 AM   #19
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Hi Tony,

I am building my first DIY amps. Here are a few observations I have made on deciding what to do. It's not a perfect list.

1. Building From A Kit:

All parts are supplied by manufacturer. Usually the instructions are very thorough and thought out. There seems to always be a message board on the web dedicated to that design offering lots of help. You learn a lot and satisfaction is high. Initial cost can be expensive for some high end kits. Only dark side, a lot of people will have the same amp.


2. Building From Scratch:

First, the dark side,
There usually is only a schematic, you must choose one and then stick with it or design your own. You must source all your parts. You must determine your own layout for parts and build or buy as box to hold it all. Cut the box (metal working or wood working tools required or higher some one to do it). Ask a ton of question on a message board.

Second, the light side.
Buy things as you need them, can maintain a budget.
You build a one of a kind, You learn a lot more. The satisfaction is certainly as good, if not better, than building from a kit.

3. Repairing an old Amplifier:

Usually everything is there. Schematics are easy to obtain, A lot of web help available. Could be a lot of work and you are fixed to that design.


I am building from scratch, JE labs 300b monoblocks, followed by a kit, BottleHead Foreplay preamp, Then maybe build some speakers, when budget permits. Hope this helps.
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Old 19th December 2002, 08:21 AM   #20
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Hi Tony,

maybeim has summed up the various options quite well. A kit or a rebuild of an older amplifier would be the easiest in many ways, but you will learn much more if you scratch build, but the level of effort required is commensurately higher.

Databooks: Getting some of these is a great idea. Another option is to download and use the free <a href="http://www.duncanamps.com/tdslpe/index.html">TDSL (Tube Datasheet Locator) program.</a>. Whilst this won't give you the schematics that some of them have, as Joel suggested, it does allow instant access to a ton of basic data for thousands of tubes, as well as the option of downloading datasheets for individual tubes.

Whilst you're there, download the <a href="http://www.duncanamps.com/psud2/index.html">PSUDII</a> or power supply designer, another free program. Whilst at this moment it might be a bit beyond your abilities, you can look at power supplies in commercial amps, and simulate them, learning a bit about how they operate at the same time.

For a schematic, have a look at the <a href="http://www.triodeel.com/gec50w.gif">Genelex 50W</a> or the <a href="http://www.triodeel.com/dynamk3.gif">Dynaco Mk3</a>.

I think the GEC amp would be an interesting, and reasonably simple build. Reliabilty should be good too as the amp is set up using data from the GEC datasheet, uses available and non-fancy parts, and could be implemented quite cheaply, or tweked to hell depending on budget and inclination. I think it would be very wise to use a wide bandwidth output transformer to ensure stability. I would suggest a Hammond P-T1650R as an absolute minimum with second hand Dyna, or new replacement Magnequest versions as being better. If your budget can stretch, the Plitrons would be great.

Cheers
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