HT stands for??? - Page 2 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Tubes / Valves

Tubes / Valves All about our sweet vacuum tubes :) Threads about Musical Instrument Amps of all kinds should be in the Instruments & Amps forum

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10th August 2006, 12:31 PM   #11
ux226 is offline ux226  Denmark
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Denmark
Quote:
Originally posted by jarthel
I guess what i'm saying is that the word tension has other meanings not related to electrical/electronics.
Sure. And the words "current" and "resistance" don't?
Actually I feel that the fact that words like tension, current and resistance have meanings not related to electricity should make them easier to understand for everyone? And _I_ like the consistency of using the terms tension, current and resistance. Voltage, amperage and ohmage (never seen that used) would qualify for equal consistency...

But this discussion is not important here

I thought you asked the question in the first place because you saw it in a text or on a schematic and needed to know the meaning?
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th August 2006, 12:45 PM   #12
jarthel is offline jarthel  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: somewhere in Australia
Quote:
Originally posted by ux226


Sure. And the words "current" and "resistance" don't?
Actually I feel that the fact that words like tension, current and resistance have meanings not related to electricity should make them easier to understand for everyone? And _I_ like the consistency of using the terms tension, current and resistance. Voltage, amperage and ohmage (never seen that used) would qualify for equal consistency...

But this discussion is not important here

I thought you asked the question in the first place because you saw it in a text or on a schematic and needed to know the meaning?

I will admit I was wrong with that

but it doesn't change the fact that a beginner/advance/expert electrical/electronics person would easily understood the context of "current" and "resistance" when it comes to electrical/electronics
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th August 2006, 12:55 PM   #13
ux226 is offline ux226  Denmark
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Denmark
Quote:
Originally posted by jarthel

but it doesn't change the fact that a beginner/advance/expert electrical/electronics person would easily understood the context of "current" and "resistance" when it comes to electrical/electronics
Correct.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th August 2006, 01:58 PM   #14
diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
 
ray_moth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Jakarta
I was brought up listening to the wireless, which had valves in it. It also had condensers and used high tension and low tension supplies. It wouldn't work unless it had a good aerial and earth.

Radio was a kind of malt, tubes were for giving enemas, capacitors were unknown, voltage was an uncouth way of saying potential, B+ was a good mark in an exam, an antenna was owned by a cockroach and ground was a kind of nut.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th August 2006, 02:47 PM   #15
diyAudio Moderator
 
JojoD818's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: searching...
Quote:
Originally posted by ray_moth
I was brought up listening to the wireless, which had valves in it. It also had condensers and used high tension and low tension supplies. It wouldn't work unless it had a good aerial and earth.

Radio was a kind of malt, tubes were for giving enemas, capacitors were unknown, voltage was an uncouth way of saying potential, B+ was a good mark in an exam, an antenna was owned by a cockroah and ground was a kind of nut.

LOL!
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th August 2006, 03:25 PM   #16
Tweeker is offline Tweeker  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Quote:
"Tension" is a Britishism.
Frogs say tension too.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf 6a3 sylvania.pdf (87.1 KB, 13 views)
__________________
Be sure your foil hat has a good low impedance ground.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th August 2006, 06:14 PM   #17
SY is offline SY  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
SY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chicagoland
Blog Entries: 1
Those Frenchies have a different word for EVERYTHING.
__________________
You might be screaming "No, no, no" and all they hear is "Who wants cake?" Let me tell you something: They all do. They all want cake.- Wilford Brimley
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th August 2006, 06:28 PM   #18
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Buenos Aires
In Spanish, it is said tension. High, low and medium. It is few times referred to as voltage.
Current is referred to as current or sometimes amperage.
IMO, it has to do with the fact that most latin countries were technical and academically closer to Europe (UK, Germany) than to the States.

I also grew making circuits which used condensers, bobbins, and resistances (not resistors) and their characteristic was capacity, inductance and resistance. Later came capacitors, inductors and resistors (together with transistors...). Tubes were (and are to this day) called valves by the knowledgeable, and lamps by the rest of the people. The CRTs were and are TRCs (same meaning, different acronym due to language conevntion).

Gastón
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th August 2006, 12:47 AM   #19
Enzo is offline Enzo  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Lansing, Michigan
Ray Moth summed it up.

Tension is an older term that hasn't disappeared yet, at least in the USA. I grew up on aerials, condensers, etc. too.

Voltage might seem like a better term than tension, but now that you know the term, will you be confused by it in the future? We cannot go back and retrospectively change all the older terminology where it still exists.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th August 2006, 08:24 AM   #20
Tweeker is offline Tweeker  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
The Germans use the term kondensator for capacitor.
__________________
Be sure your foil hat has a good low impedance ground.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mic stands for FR etc Geoff H Multi-Way 6 29th April 2007 05:17 AM
Speaker Stands? AJ Bertelson Multi-Way 5 22nd May 2004 02:57 AM
M51 Mic stands Doug Everything Else 4 4th July 2003 10:36 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 05:08 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2